13:30 GMT +317 October 2019
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    Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May arrives at church, as Brexit turmoil continues, in Sonning, Britain May 12, 2019

    'More of the Same': PM May to Push Brexit Plan Amid Fierce Backlash From Commons

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    Mrs May will discuss changes made to her Brexit plan, which is set to be published later today and includes guarantees for MPs to vote on holding a second referendum.

    UK prime minister Theresa May will argue for her new Brexit plan in Commons on Wednesday amid growing opposition from her own Conservative party after begging MPs on Tuesday for "one last chance" to deliver Brexit or risking defaulting on leaving the European Union. 

    But top Tories plan to ask for changes to a rule allowing a vote of no confidence in the Prime Minister's leadership, with Conservative Nigel Evans urging the 1922 Committee on Wednesday to change party rules to permit an immediate no-confidence vote on Mrs. May, despite her surviving a similar vote in December and rules stating that she cannot face a second one until 12 months have passed. 

    Some members of the Prime Minister's Cabinet have remained cautious. Michael Gove, environmental secretary backed Mrs. May's plan, stating that MPs should "take a little bit of time and step back" to "reflect" on details in the bill. Commons leader Andrea Leadsom also stated she was "looking very carefully at the legislation" to make "sure that it delivers Brexit".

    To date, three incarnations of PM May's deal have been rejected in Commons, and subsequent talks with Labour have collapsed. Sir Keir Starmer, Shadow Brexit secretary, slammed the deal as being "too weak" and said it was a "repackaged version of the same old deal" made from a "weak and disintegrating government". 

    But MPs from across the political spectrum have roasted May's Brexit plan, with Democratic Unionist Party deputy leader Nigel Dodds stating that Mrs May "will have a job" persuading unionists on the Irish backstop, and leading Tory Brexiteer Jacob Rees-Mogg stating he support Uxbridge MP Boris Johnson's contest for leadership.

    Mrs. May introduced several concessions to her Withdrawal Agreement in her speech on Tuesday, including guarantees to allow MPs to vote on holding another referendum on Brexit and votes on customs arrangements, including a temporary customs union called a "customs compromise".  

    READ MORE: UK PM May's Brexit Deal Has 'Absolutely No Chance' of Being Approved – Scholar

    She also added a legal obligation for the UK to "seek to conclude alternative arrangements" on the Irish backstop by 2020, and should the backstop be implemented, further guarantees for Northern Ireland to remain within the UK and same customs agreement. 

    Her compromises also include bills to preserve and improve workers' rights and environmental standards post-Brexit, in addition to a legal obligation to request changes on political declarations to future relations with the European Union. 

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    Tags:
    Brexit amendments, brexit concerns, Brexit negotiations, Brexit 'deal or no deal', Brexit Plan, Brexit, UK Conservative Party, 1922 Committee, UK Labour Party, Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), Nigel Dodds, David Lammy, Jacob Rees-Mogg, Keir Starmer, Nicola Sturgeon, Boris Johnson, Theresa May, United Kingdom
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