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    'Buchenwald Princess': UK Terror Suspect Won 'Miss Hitler' Contest – Prosecution

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    The nickname has been linked by prosecutors to her boyfriend’s visit to the Nazi death camp near Weimar in Germany shortly before the contest, evidence of which he posted online at the time.

    A 22-year-old Brit, Alice Cutter, who was recently tried under anti-terrorism legislation, was found to have earlier signed up for the “Miss Hitler”  beauty pageant under the nickname “Buchenwald Princess” and supposedly gritted out a win in the contest, prosecutor Barnaby Jameson told a Birmingham court on Wednesday, as cited by The Sun.

    According to Jameson, the woman’s choice of nickname is hardly a coincidence, but rather a nod at the notorious Nazi death camp Buchenwald, since her fiancé Mark Jones, who is purported to be a member of the banned extremist group National Action, had visited Buchenwald a month prior to the contest and was photographed performing a Nazi salute in the execution chamber. 

    Cutter, who, along with Jones, is from Halifax, is charged with spreading hatred and advocating for “pathological racial prejudice” while being an active member of the same group, National Action — which was banned in 2016 after it applauded the murder of British Labour MP Jo Cox by an extremist who, as court stated during the trial, demonstrated "admiration for Nazis" and was found to have suffered from mental issues.

    To prove Cutter's suspected membership in the banned organisation, the prosecutor presented the jury with a picture that circulated online, allegedly showing Cutter wearing a National Action mask.

    When it comes to the beauty contest itself, the pageant, titled “Miss Hitler 2016”, was allegedly set up by the group “as a publicity stunt” to attract new members.

    READ MORE: Tommy Robinson Will Face Trial Again For Contempt of Court 'in Public Interest'

    The ongoing court case is seeing four people being tried over the same hate speech charges, including Cutter and Jones’s co-defendants Garry Jack, 23, and Connor Scothern, 18, with all four denying the accusations, as well as being members of the hard-line right-wing group in violation of the 2016 ban.

    Cutter herself was first charged last year, and thereafter denied allegations, as well as pleaded not guilty during a previous hearing in January.

    It is not the first time that a criminal case against right-wing radicals has been launched in Britain in recent years. During one of the most high-profile ones following Jo Cox’s murder and amid the governmental crackdown on those suspected of inciting to hatred, National Action’s leader, Christopher Lythgoe, was sentenced to eight years behind bars.

    Tags:
    Nazi, legislation, terrorism, Adolph Hitler, United Kingdom
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