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    A Boeing 737 MAX returns from a flight test at Boeing Field in Seattle, Washington

    No Boeing 737 MAX 8 Aircraft Left in EU Airspace - Report

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    The European Union's aviation safety regulator, the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), on Tuesday closed the bloc's airspace for all Boeing 737 MAX 8 aircraft following the deadly Ethiopian Airways crash.

    Following the suspension of all 737 MAX 8 flights in the EU, non-commercial aviation media outlet AIRLIVE reported Tuesday that among other flights, the two SmartWings Boeing 737 MAX 8 aircraft that had been diverted from Prague airport became the last two planes that have left the EU airspace.

    On Sunday, a Nairobi-bound 737 MAX 8, operated by Ethiopian Airlines, crashed minutes after takeoff from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. All 157 people from over 30 countries aboard the flight were killed. Aviation authorities and airlines in several countries, including the European Union, China, Singapore, Indonesia, Malaysia and Australia, have suspended all operation of the 737 MAX 8 in their airspace following the incident.

    READ MORE: Professor on Boeing: Crash May Have ‘Very Big Impact’ on Firm’s Future

    Other aviation authorities and airlines that announced they were suspending Boeing 737 MAX 8 flights include Ethiopian Airlines, Indonesia's Transportation Ministry, Aeromexico, Aerolineas Argentinas, Cayman Airways, South Korea's Eastar Jet, South Africa's Comair Airways and Oman's Public Authority for Civil Aviation.

    The Ethiopian Airlines crash is the second disaster involving the jet in less than six months. In October, a new Lion Air Boeing 737 MAX 8 flight went down over the Java Sea, killing over 180 people.

    READ MORE: FAA Says Boeing 737 MAX 'Airworthy' Despite 2nd Fatal Crash in Nearly 5 Months

    Meanwhile, Boeing said in a press release on Monday that in light of the recent deadly crash, the whole 737 MAX fleet would adopt new, enhanced software in the coming weeks. In a separate statement on Monday, the company's Chairman, President and CEO Dennis Muilenburg said that Boeing is confident that its 737 MAX airplanes are safe. Muilenberg also cautioned his employees to avoid speculation as the investigation into the crash unfolds.

    READ MORE: Ethiopian Airlines Boeing's Black Box Recovered at Crash Site — Reports

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    flights, suspension, airspace, Boeing 737 MAX, EU
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