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    British Prime Minister Theresa May looks on at the EU parliament headquarters in Brussels, Belgium February 7, 2019.

    Brexit Latest: UK Crash Out Most Likely, as Irish-EU Solidarity Bond Unbreakable

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    The legal position of Downing Street on Brexit is that "we leave without a deal," said the government's leader in the House of Commons, Andrea Leadsom.

    That's what will essentially happen, Leadsom added, describing the current prospect for the Prime Minister Theresa May and her ministers.

    The PM has suffered yet another defeat on Thursday, when the Parliament defeated the motion that would have required the government to immediately open negotiations to extend the Article 50 period by at least three months, the motion to reaffirm support for May's plan to seek changes to her deal, and the motion — proposed by Jeremy Corbyn — to set a deadline of 27 February for the government to hold a vote on their deal or make a statement that there's no agreement and allow MPs to vote on how to proceed.

    Commenting on the vote in the House of Commons, Irish Foreign Minister Simon Coveney said on Friday that UK lawmakers don't "seem to be asking for anything specific" thereby "frustrating" both Irish and EU leaders.  

    Labour Party chief, Corbyn, as well as UK Brexit Minister Stephen Barclay, will visit Brussels next week for talks with EU Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier, whose "door is always open," according to his spokesman. Theresa May is also expected to travel to Brussels next week in order to gain concessions from the EU leadership.

    The EU chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier, right, welcomes British Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn for a meeting at EU headquarters in Brussels, Thursday July 13, 2017.
    © AP Photo / Olivier Hoslet
    The EU chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier, right, welcomes British Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn for a meeting at EU headquarters in Brussels, Thursday July 13, 2017.

    Next week serves as a window for negotiators to attempt at reaching a suitable deal. On 27 February, the House of Commons will hold a debate and non-binding votes on Brexit options.

    READ MORE: Brexit Timeline: Here Is What You Need to Know

    While rumours of possible last-minute backing down on the part of EU have been flowing in Westminster, according to the Irish PM Leo Varadkar, those circulating the idea are "in for a nasty surprise." 

    On Friday, Varadkar reaffirmed EU's solidarity with Ireland on Brexit, adding:

    "One of the most striking things about what's unfolded since the UK's decision to leave has been the remarkable solidarity from the EU side, despite many attempts to bilateralise issues. The solidarity has been strong and resolute and those who think it will break at the last moment are in for a nasty surprise."

    EU Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker and Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar hold a news conference after their meeting in Brussels, Belgium February 6, 2019.
    © REUTERS / Francois Lenoir
    EU Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker and Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar hold a news conference after their meeting in Brussels, Belgium February 6, 2019.

    Moving forward, one of the following Brexit scenarios is possible: crashing out without a deal, holding a second Brexit referendum, agreeing on altered deal by the PM ore requesting an extension to Article 50.

    The Taoiseach said extending the March 29 deadline is "certainly possible."

    "If there is going to be an extension, it needs to be with a purpose, it needs to be with a view to securing and ratifying an agreement. I don't think anyone would like to see this stalemate or impasse or period of purgatory continue for months and months and months."

    Related:

    UK Lawmakers Reject Amendment Calling on Gov't to Delay Brexit
    UK 'Waning' Nation, 'Too Small' to Stand on Its Own – Dutch PM on Brexit
    Brexit Timeline: Here Is What You Need to Know
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