01:35 GMT +309 December 2019
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    Drinkers watch a television screen in the Red Lion public house on Whitehall, as it shows Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May speaking in the House of Commons in London on January 15, 2019, before MPs vote on the government's Brexit deal

    May Says New Election Would Extend Article 50, 'Worst Thing' for Country, Brexit

    © AFP 2019 / Tolga AKMEN
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    A day after UK prime minister Theresa May's Brexit plan was crushed in Parliament 432 to 202, she stated that a general election would be the "worst thing" MPs could hold amid tense party divisions unfolding up to the Brexit deadline.

    Britain will leave the European Union on 29 March and that the bloc would only extend 'Article 50' negotiations with a credible alternative Brexit plan B, UK prime minister Theresa May said at PMQs on Wednesday.

    "Today it was asked a simpler question: should the next step be a general election? I believe that is the worst thing we could do," she said to the sound of hecklers. "It would deepen division when we need unity. It would bring chaos when we need certainty. It would bring delay when we need to move forward."

    Her comments come after European Commission spokeswoman Margaritis Schinas said on Wednesday that whilst talks would continue, the withdrawal agreement was "not open for renegotiation".

    "We are always ready to meet and to talk, but the European Council in its Article 50 formation said in December that the withdrawal agreement, and I repeat, the withdrawal agreement, agreed by the 27 [EU members] and the United Kingdom is not open for renegotiation," Schinas said during a press conference.

    READ MORE: Labour Peer Doubts May Will Lose No-Confidence Vote After Brexit Deal Defeat

    The Prime Minister also said that the EU would only extend Article 50 if Parliament was "clear" there was an agreement underway. But the Commission stated that the UK has not requested to extend Article 50 to date.

    UK Labour and opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn tabled a no-confidence vote on Wednesday after MPs voted down PM May's Brexit deal on Tuesday in what is considered the biggest political defeat in British history, by a margin of 230 votes. Mrs. May had scheduled the 'meaningful' vote on her Brexit plan in December, but postponed it to 15 January to seek reassurances from Brussels, citing fears that her plan would be overwhelmingly rejected by MPs.

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    Tags:
    Brexit delay, Brexit plan, Brexit impasse, Brexit deal, Brexit blues, Brexit negotiations, Brexit 'deal or no deal', Article 50, Brexit, UK Parliament, European Commission, Margaritis Schinas, Theresa May, European Union, United Kingdom, Brussels, London
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