18:34 GMT +317 January 2019
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    Anti-Brexit supporters talk as they protest opposite the House of Parliament in London, Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2018

    UK Government Accepts Plan-B Demand if Theresa May's Brexit Deal Rejected

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    The UK government has agreed to respect terms within the Grieve Amendment, amid ongoing chaos and in-fighting over Parliament's meaningful vote set for 15 January aimed at helping MPs define Britain's uncertain Brexit future.

    Parliament passed the amendment on Wednesday, which demands the government to shape a plan B in three working days after the "meaningful" Brexit vote next Tuesday instead of 21 days as specified by UK law.

    "Of course the government will do so, the prime minister has shown her willingness to always return to this House at the first possible opportunity if there is anything to report in terms of our Brexit deal and we will continue to do so," House of Commons leader Andrea Leadsom said in response to an MPs question on Thursday.

    The deadline will be 21 January, as Parliament will not sit on the 18th.

    Calls for General Election

    UK Labour and opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn demanded that general elections take place 'at the earliest opportunity' should Commons vote down UK prime minister Theresa May's Brexit deal.

    A general election will take priority over a new referendum on Brexit, the opposition leader said, adding that Labour will vote against the Prime Minister's Brexit deal next Tuesday.

    "If a general election cannot be secured, then we will keep all options on the table, including the option of campaigning for a public vote," Mr. Corbyn told audiences in a speech in Wakefield, England. "But an election must be the priority. It is not only the most practical option, it is also the most democratic option."

    Corbyn also said that a new Labour government would not rule out extending the UK's withdrawal from the European Union, adding that "has to be time to negotiate".

    READ MORE: May, Corbyn Erupt Into Commons Sparring Match at PMQs, MPs Urge General Election

    "Moving into office at a period right up against the clock, there would need to be time for that negotiation," Corbyn said in answer to questions after a speech in Wakefield, northern England. "An extension would be a possibility, because clearly there has to be time to negotiate."

    MPs dealt the May Cabinet the first major defeat on Tuesday evening over finance spending after voting 303 to 296 in favour of the Cooper Amendment, which curbs government tax powers if the UK government leaves the EU without parliamentary approval. Cross-party support was given for the amendment after twenty Tory MPs, including former Cabinet ministers, rebelled against the beleaguered Prime Minister's Brexit deal.

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    Tags:
    Brexit plan, Brexit impasse, Brexit 'deal or no deal', Grieve Amendment, Article 50, meaningful vote, Brexit, UK Labour Party, House of Commons, Andrea Leadsom, Jeremy Corbyn, Dominic Grieve, Theresa May, United Kingdom
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