18:02 GMT +322 November 2019
Listen Live
    Brexit

    EU Publishes Contingency Plan for 'Disorderly' Brexit

    CC0
    Europe
    Get short URL
    0 0 0
    Subscribe

    European ministers have published a contingency action plan outlining protocols to implement if the United Kingdom leaves in a "disorderly manner", the European Commission (EC) said on Tuesday.

    The Commission released its detailed communique outlining several continency actions to implement for key areas if leaders negotiate a no-deal with the United Kingdom. The latest plan follows a communique published on 19 July 2018. 

    The European College of Commissioners also "adopted two legislative proposals" to change current EU laws for visas and energy efficiency after the United Kingdom leaves the EU.  

    The legislative changes are necessary "irrespective of the outcome of the withdrawal negotiations", the communique said. 

    The Commission also published a notice providing updates on future changes for citizens and businesses travelling between Britain and the EU after 29 March, including protocols on "border checks and customs controls, driving licences and pet passports," and others. 

    "While the European Commission is working hard for a deal, and continues to put citizens first in the negotiations, the UK's withdrawal will undoubtedly cause disruption — for example in business supply chains — whether or not there is a deal," the statement read.  

    "Contingency measures cannot remedy the full effects of this disruption," it continued. "In the event of a no deal scenario, these disruptions will be even more significant and the speed of preparations would have to increase significantly. Contingency measures in narrowly defined areas may, exceptionally, be needed in order to protect the interests and the integrity of the EU." 

    The Commission would take measures on all contingencies "in limited areas where they are necessary to protect the vital interests of the EU and where preparedness measures are not currently possible," adding that they would be temporary, limited, and "adopted unilaterally by the EU" according to EU legislation.   

    "While national measures by Member States represent a central element on contingency planning, the Commission stands ready to intensify its coordination of the work of Member States in order to ensure that the EU remains united and that any measures are applied consistently and coherently within the EU," the statement read. "In particular, the Commission will support Ireland in finding solutions addressing the specific challenges of Irish businesses." 

    READ MORE: Minister Refuses to Back PM May's Claim of UK Being Better Off After Brexit

    The Commission adopted two amendments to the EU's Energy Efficiency Directive based on EU-28 energy consumption figures, adjusting the figures to a 27-member bloc after the UK's withdrawal.  

    It will not affect agreements made in June and EU members will remain committed to 32.5 percent energy efficiency targets by 2030, the statement said.  

    The changes will conditionally exempt UK nationals from visa requirements on short-stay EU visits if UK officials reciprocate "non-discriminatory visa-free travel to EU citizens travelling to the UK". 

    After the UK leaves, an EU-27 group will increase efforts "over the coming weeks" via preparedness seminars on various issues, "including financial services, air transport, social security coordination, sanitary and phytosanitary requirements, amongst others," it said.  

    EU leaders will meet in Brussels on Wednesday to continue preparedness discussions.

    Related:

    Without a Withdrawal Agreement, There’s no Transition Period - Prof on Brexit
    UK Prime Minister May: Time is Running Out, Brexit Talks 'In the Endgame'
    UK’s May Expected to Unveil Brexit Draft to Ministers at Cabinet Meeting
    Dangerous Oscillation as Brexit Deal Gets Banged Up & Time's Running Out
    Tags:
    Brexit plan, Brexit impasse, Brexit negotiations, Brexit 'deal or no deal', EU parliament, Brexit, European Commission’s Department of Energy, European Commission, European Union, United Kingdom, Brussels
    Community standardsDiscussion
    Comment via FacebookComment via Sputnik