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    Beachgoers walk past a sand sculpture made by Indian sand artist Sudersan Pattnaik with a message of prayers for the missing Malaysian Airlines flight MH370

    MH370 Found? Briton Claims to Have Spotted Missing Jet's Wreckage on Sea Floor

    © AFP 2018 / Asit Kumar
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    The March 8, 2014 disappearance of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 prompted one of the biggest search missions in history, yet a four-year multi-million dollar joint operation by Australian, Malaysian and Chinese investigators has failed to find any sign of the plane.

    An amateur British MH370 investigator claims to have found a satellite image that shows the outlines of what could be the missing Malaysia Airlines jet resting on the ocean floor off the coast of Thailand and Myanmar.

    "It appears to be the shape of a plane in the water. I've got a feeling it could be it. It's the shape of it. If you look at it from above. I know it looks quite small but the ridges and mounds make me think it could be it,” the man, who works in aviation security, told The Sun Online.

    A flurry of theories have emerged as to what happened to Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 since the plane dropped from radar screens close to Phuket Island in the Strait of Malacca more than four years ago.

    Most experts believe that the airliner crashed in the Indian Ocean after it was tracked taking a sharp turn towards the Andaman Sea and later veering south. Others have claimed that the jet may have turned north.

    According to the most recent theory, the jumbo jet may have crashed in the Cambodian jungle.

    Flight MH370 was carrying 239 passengers and had been on a routine flight from Kuala Lumpur in Malaysia to Beijing on March 8, 2014 when it suddenly went missing.

    At 12:14 a.m. on March 8, 2014, ground control lost contact with the pilots when the plane was near Phuket Island in the Strait of Malacca.

    Before that, however, Malaysian authorities believe the last words heard from the plane, from either the pilot or co-pilot, was "Good night Malaysian three seven zero."

    READ MORE: British MH370 Hunters Scrap Search for Missing Boeing, Fearing for Their Lives

    Satellite "pings" from the plane suggest that it continued flying for around seven hours before it would have ran out of fuel.

    Experts have calculated the most likely crash site around 1,000 miles west of Perth, Australia.

    But all efforts to track down the plane have failed and the jet’s whereabouts have remained a mystery ever since.

    Related:

    'Long Spiral Descent': Nat Geo Documentary Traces MH370's Final Moments
    Google Maps Updates Images With Alleged MH370 Crash Site, Plane Still There
    Tags:
    purported crash site, British enthusiast, enthisiast, missing plane, Malaysia Airlines MH370, Malaysia Airlines, United Kingdom
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