10:13 GMT +319 October 2019
Listen Live
    The Euro logo is pictured in front of the former headquarter of the European Central Bank (ECB) in Frankfurt am Main, western Germany, on July 20, 2015.

    European Central Bank Urges Eurozone Reform to Boost GDP Growth

    © AFP 2019 / Daniel Roland
    Europe
    Get short URL
    111
    Subscribe

    A plan to establish a European fiscal union, proposed by French President Emmanuel Macron, is gaining traction across Europe, as both German Chancellor Angela Merkel and European Central Bank (ECB) policymakers are now on board, but non-Eurozone EU members are still unimpressed.

    Kristian Rouz — The European Central Bank (ECB) said France and Germany should reach an agreement to reform the Eurozone into a fiscal union, allowing Brussels to conduct a coordinated budget policy.

    This, policymakers say, would allow for improved coordination between the ECB's monetary policies and the Eurozone's fiscal policies, making it easier to support economic growth.

    READ MORE: Bad for Business Too: Biggest Europe Bank to End Fossil Fuel Investment

    The ECB released a report last week suggesting "more inclusive" structural reforms in the Eurozone could bolster the bloc's growth potential by alleviating the long-standing North-South divide and enhancing the Eurozone's unity.

    "Well-designed structural policies could yield substantial benefits for euro area citizens via a stronger and more inclusive growth in employment and incomes," ECB economists said.

    The report was published on the heels of a momentous meeting between French President Emmanuel Macron and German Chancellor Angela Merkel, who reaffirmed their commitment to taking the European integration project to the next stage — a fiscal union.

    A common Eurozone budget would allow for several positive developments.

    First, a joint fiscal policy could address the challenges posed by the ECB's monetary stimulus. The ultra-low interest rate environment and the ECB's bond-buying program have required a tighter fiscal response from the national finance ministries during the post-crisis recovery of the past decade.

    This means individual governments had to raise taxes and curb spending in order to avoid overheating of their economies amidst the massive influx of money from the ECB. The main problem has been the discrepancies between fiscal policies in the countries of the European North and South — whilst Germany has had no problem with fiscal tightening, similar policies have caused pain in Greece.

    "Structural changes need to be country-specific and tailor-made to reflect the specific national starting conditions in terms of economic structures and institutions, as well as social preferences," ECB analysts wrote.

    A unified Eurozone budget could apply a single standard of fiscal policy across the bloc, easing concerns of German taxpayers that they are funding social benefits payments in Greece.

    READ MORE: European Central Bank to Wrap Up Easy Money Policies by Year-end

    Second, a joint Eurozone fiscal policy would facilitate the funding of infrastructure projects across the bloc, making it economically homogenous and enabling an intensified business activity and exchange in goods and services.

    This would drive economic expansion across the Eurozone and redistribute the benefits of GDP growth more equally amongst member states.

    Additionally, a unified Eurozone budget would enable a more efficient crackdown on corruption and tax evasion across the bloc, which would "not only support growth but also enhance equity, social trust, and social fairness," ECB researchers said.

    However, Merkel was initially skeptical of Macron's proposals on a fiscal union, which appeared to be "too radical" for her. Germany would contribute the most to the single Eurozone budget, whilst some German policymakers were worried that the lion's share of spending from the common budget would go to underperforming nations, such as Greece.

    "Macron is like Sisyphus pushing his rock up," Isabelle Mateos y Lago of BlackRock said. "There's, finally, a potential for some progress, and a new crisis is threatening to sweep it all away."

    Eventually, Merkel approved Macron's plan, endorsing a single Eurozone budget during the meeting in Meseberg, Germany, earlier this month.

    READ MORE: EU-US Tariff War Will Affect Both Sides of the Atlantic — Professor

    The next step for Macron is convincing the EU leaders a common Eurozone budget is a good idea for non-Eurozone EU members. His argument is a better Eurozone economy would also drive the economic expansion in the EU periphery. His opponents are concerned non-euro members would be left out. Additionally, there is a rising Euroscepticism within the Eurozone itself, mainly due to Brussels' political woes.  

    "There's a destructive mood in Europe these days," Enrico Letta, former Italian prime minister and now president of the think tank Institut Jacques Delors said. "The window for reforms is closing, because of the seven months lost negotiating a new German coalition, because of Austrian and Italian elections."

    With the ECB and Merkel's support, Macron is now expected to take his fiscal proposals to Brussels and, quite possibly, tour the European capitals to rally additional support for his ambitious plan.

    Related:

    Eurozone 'Always In Danger and Reforms Have Not Gone Far Enough' – Professor
    Merkel: Berlin Ready for Compromise With France to Reform Eurozone
    Italian Ministers Attack Merkel, Want Germany Out of Eurozone
    Macron Allegedly Pushes to Make French Dominant Language in EU Amid Brexit
    A Tightening of Borders: Macron, Merkel Offer Conflicting Visions of EU Reform
    Tags:
    budget, eurozone, European Central Bank, Emmanuel Macron, European Union
    Community standardsDiscussion
    Comment via FacebookComment via Sputnik