14:05 GMT +317 June 2019
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    British Government to Review Anti-Terror Deportation Law

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    Review of national security legislation comes on the heels of the damaging Windrush Scandal that rocked the government of Theresa May and threatened her hold on the Prime Ministership.

    The government of the United Kingdom has agreed to conduct a review of national security legislation enabling people to be deported for posing a "terrorist threat" after revelations in the British press of the power being repeatedly misused.

    Section 322 (5) of the Immigration Act allows for an individual deemed to pose a risk involving terrorist activity to be deported from the United Kingdom.

    Just on Tuesday, the new Home Secretary Sajid Javid admitted in a letter to the House of Commons Select Committee that around 20 highly skilled UK residents had been wrongfully deported under the measure. Around 1,000 highly skilled individuals are currently facing deportation from the country under the controversial legislation.

    The government's U-turn comes in the aftermath of the Windrush Scandal, which claimed the job of Home Secretary Amber Rudd and raised questions over Prime Minister Theresa May's position due to her implementation of the policy during her tenure in the role.

    The "Windrush Generation" refers to immigrants from former British Colonies, mostly in the Caribbean, in the post-war decades and were granted indefinite leave to remain but have never acquired citizenship. 

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    Tags:
    proposed deportation, deportation orders, National Security, immigration laws, Windrush Scandal, UK Home Office, Sajid Javid, Amber Rudd, Theresa May, Caribbean, United Kingdom
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