21:39 GMT +323 October 2019
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    In this June 2006 file photo a model monster replica of the legendary sea serpent of Loch Ness, Nessie, provides a photo op for visitors in Drumnadrochit, Scotland

    Don’t Hide It! Google Reportedly Edits Scottish Loch Ness Monster Pics

    © AP Photo / Norm Goldstein,File
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    Sightings of what is affectionately referred to as "Nessie" climbed to a record-breaking number of 11 last year, with many partaking in contests for the best visual proof of its existence.

    According to The Daily Star, Google Maps has been blamed for blurring the spots where the elusive Loch Ness monster allegedly popped up.

    The popular navigation app and service has been used by conspiracy theorists to prove that many phenomena, including those connected with Nessie sightings, really exist. At some point, conspirators believed they "had struck gold" while searching the mountainous Scottish land, The Daily Star wrote.

    For instance, one satellite image featured some mysterious object lurking beneath the water surface and which resembled part of the monster’s body, according to Nessie activists. However, the spot in the picture was reportedly blurred by Google Maps.

    Legends around Loch Ness claim that the great lake contains a huge monster, with a number of sightings registered annually. 

    The latest one occurred as a tourist from the US state of Idaho reported seeing, while holidaying in Scotland, a few large grey shapes moving in the water near the Urquhart Castle jetty.

    READ MORE: Nessie-Spotting: US Tourist Catches Sight of Loch Ness Monster and Her Family

    Sightings of the Loch Ness Monster reached a record-breaking number last year. The 11 sightings, registered in the official 2017 sightings book, have been the highest number this century.

    Interestingly, more and more people are showing interest in Nessie-related events, as competitions for the best Nessie sighting are increasingly introduced across Scotland, with the public invited to even write books on whether the Loch Ness monster truly exists.

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    Tags:
    lakes, Loch Ness Monster, sighting, monster, conspiracy theories, conspiracy, Google Maps, Google, Scotland
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