14:40 GMT +320 September 2019
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    People walk through the snow in York, England (File)

    Some Don't Like it Cold: 'Beast From the East' Hits UK, Sets Twitter Afire

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    Weather forecasters have warned of the coldest beginning of March in Britain in thirty years, with temperatures expected to plunge to minus 8C (17.6F) across the UK.

    The incoming cold spell from northern Russia, dubbed the 'Beast from the East', will almost certain cause travel chaos and disrupt mobile phone services in Britain, according to meteorologists.

    The country's Met Office has already warned of a "potential risk to life and property" due to what is expected to be the coldest early March in thirty years in the UK, where the mercury may drop to minus 8C (17.6F) in the next few days.

    In some parts of Britain, temperatures may nosedive to minus 15C (5F), and icy conditions there are expected to last until the middle of March.

    READ MORE: Breath of Siberia: Biting Frost Reigns in Northeastern China (PHOTOS, VIDEO)

    At least 20 centimeters of snow are predicted in many areas across England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland, with the Met Office saying that "travel delays on roads are likely, stranding some vehicles and passengers."

    "We refer to March 1 as being the first day of spring, and of course March 1 will be right in the middle of this cold spell, so spring will be postponed for a couple of weeks, shall we say," the Met Office's Martin Bowles said.

    Twitter users were quick to react to the news, with some expressing surprise about the name of the cold snap from Russia.

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    Tags:
    temperatures, spring, chaos, travel, weather, Met Office, Britain
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