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    An anti-Brexit, pro European Union campaigner holds a EU flag, near Parliament in London, Wednesday, Nov. 22, 2017. Britain's Treasury chief has little room to maneuver Wednesday as he reveals his spending plans to a nation bracing for the shock of Brexit.

    Fed Up After Brexit: Poll Shows Majority of Brits Second-Guessing Split With EU

    © AP Photo / Kirsty Wigglesworth
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    British Prime Minister Theresa May has repeatedly stressed the possibility of a "no deal" scenario, adding that she is ready to walk away from negotiations, provoking increasing public anxiety. Meanwhile, many are questioning if the messy break-up is really worth it.

    A new poll conducted by Bostock Marketing Group (BMG) has revealed that 57 percent of British citizens support the idea of a second referendum on Brexit if Theresa May's notion that "no deal is better than a bad deal" is tested on the UK economy.

    Among respondents in the 18 to 34 age cohort, the percentage of those in favor of another vote is far higher, with 73 percent backing the initiative.

    READ MORE: UKIP Leader Uses Racist Scandal to Distract Public From His Brexit Flaws – MEP

    The pressure on the Prime Minister is mounting as another unrelated survey from ComRes revealed that 55 percent of voters would support Britain remaining in the EU.

    Such predictions contradict former UKIP leader Nigel Farage's controversial statement that a repeat referendum would deliver the same result and settle the issue "for a generation." Previously, Farage, who is believed to be one the nation's most active supporters of the UK's withdrawal from the EU, severely criticized those suggesting giving citizens another chance to decide on Britain's future in the bloc.

    On June 23, 2016 the UK held a referendum on leaving the European Union. A majority, 52 percent, voted to exit the bloc, while 48 percent were against the idea.

    Some pro-EU politicians, including the Liberal Democrats, continue to call for holding a second vote, claiming that British people did not understand the deep ramifications of leaving the EU, whereas Theresa May, who is currently in the process of negotiations on the terms of the country's withdrawal, has ruled out any possibility of another referendum.

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    Brexit deal, deal, referendum, Theresa May, United Kingdom
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