07:19 GMT +314 October 2019
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    British soldiers board the Royal Navy warship HMS Albion, background, at Santander's port, northern Spain, on Tuesday, April 20, 2010. The warship came to take back to England nearly 800 British soldiers and civilians stranded by the volcanic ash cloud.

    Royal Navy Assault Ship Crew Receive Full Scale Training on UK Beaches

    © AP Photo / Alvaro Barrientos
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    Crew members on-board Britain's Royal Navy assault ship HMS Albion are almost ready to make a splash after receiving operational sea training in the UK.

    Royal Marines have stormed beaches in Devon and Cornwall, launched an attack on a Cornish fortress and implemented a full scale amphibious landing as part of their training on HMS Albion.

    The crew's tasks also included polishing up on their diplomacy skills, delivering humanitarian aid and patching up a fake community affected by a natural disaster.

    The US$119m refit of the assault ship comes amid speculation that the British government intended to decommission HMS Albion and HMS Bulwark.

    Rumors are rife that the ships would be scaled back as part of a review of Britain’s national security capabilities under the UK Government’s 2015 Strategic Defence and Security Review.

    During a recent debate in Westminster Hall, minister for defense procurement, Harriett Baldwin faced calls from MP's to safeguard the future of Britain’s naval capabilities.

    Mrs. Baldwin said that the defense review is "ongoing" and no decisions have been put to minister.

    Final Hurdle

    However, the Royal Navy says that the crew of "Britain's future flagship HMS Albion are half-way through all-action autumn training to prepare them for duties around the globe.

    "This is the final hurdle the sailors and Royal Marines must overcome to prove they are ready for the potential real challenges ahead," a statement from Britain’s Ministry of Defense said.

    "The assault ship has undergone extensive trials and training since returning to sea in the summer," the statement added.

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    Tags:
    crew members, assault boats, ship, British Royal Navy, UK Ministry of Defence, Royal Navy, Westminster, Devon, Cornwall, Great Britain, United Kingdom, London
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