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    Britain's Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, 2nd right, chats with British entrepeneur Brent Hoberman, left, anti-cyber bullying campaigner James Okulaja, 2nd left, and President of EMEA Business and Operations for Google, Matt Brittin during his visit to launch the national action plan to tackle cyberbullying at the London headquarters of Google and YouTube in King's Cross, London, Thursday, Nov. 16, 2017.

    Royal Seal of Approval: Prince William to Fight Cyberbullying Among Young People

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    Social media giants Facebook and Snapchat have been recruited by Britain's Prince William to combat cyberbullying among young people.

    The Duke of Cambridge has spoken of the 'human tragedy' caused by intolerable cyberbullying after launching a new initiative with major tech firms on Thursday, November 16, which offers help and support to young people facing anonymous abuse online.

    The new guide — similar to a 'Green Cross Code' — aims to combat bullying by teaching young people aged between 11 and 16 what to do if they fall victim. Britain has now become the first country in the world to launch a national, youth-led, code of conduct for the Internet.

    The prince — second in line to the British throne — hopes that if it proves successful and that the idea can also become a 'global blueprint' and adopted elsewhere.

    With the involvement of the social media platforms — which also includes Twitter, Google and Apple — bullying victims requiring emotional support will be put in touch with a counselor from the UK youngsters' charity Childline. The project urges young people to 'stop, speak, support' when online as well as encourage them to stop negative behavior, tell a responsible adult and prop up victims.

    Royal Interest

    Prince William became interested in helping to tackle the issue shortly after his son Prince George was born, having been told about a boy who killed himself because of online abuse.

    In a video released on Wednesday, November 15, ahead of the launch of the National Action Plan, the Prince warned that anonymity online can be 'really, really dangerous' and can lead to the 'human tragedy' caused by intolerable cyberbullying. It shows him meeting Lucy Alexander, whose son Felix killed himself as a result of abuse, and also, Chloe Hine, who attempted to take her own life at the age of 13.

    Tags:
    online campaign, bullying, social media, behavior, Snapchat, Facebook, Prince William, United Kingdom, London
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