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    From Brexit to Liberalism: Britons Tell Sputnik What Matters Most This Election

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    UK General Election 2017 (130)
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    In less than 24 hours the polling stations around the UK will open and once again, voters will head to the ballot box to cast their vote, electing the next party and person to lead Britain.

    Britain's main political parties are on Wednesday (June 7), the very last day before the June 8 general election, butting heads in one final push. Whether it's the Conservatives, Labour or UKIP, all parties have been campaigning relentlessly to get their messages across to the public. There, of course, can only be one winner and well, it's for the British people to ultimately decide which party that will be.

    A polling station sign is seen ahead of the forthcoming general election, in London, Britain June 6, 2017.
    © REUTERS / Toby Melville
    A polling station sign is seen ahead of the forthcoming general election, in London, Britain June 6, 2017.

    Sputnik took to the streets of London to speak to people from all walks of life, asking who they will be voting for in the election — the viewpoints, unsurprisingly, varied significantly.

    The NHS and Education

    Linda, a teacher who lives in the capital, said that her concern around the educational sector, as well as healthcare, was a pertinent factor in who she would be voting for June 8.

    "There have been a lot of changes and I am concerned about the future of our education system. Also the NHS is not getting enough funding. I have a parent that is getting older and I am concerned about her healthcare," Linda told Sputnik.

    Sophie shared Linda's views, however she said she believed that once the Conservative government has been removed from power, real change could take place.

    "Healthcare is the most important thing for me. I've spent a lot of time in the hospital, and I can feel what the cuts are doing to the NHS. I feel that is something a Labour government would fix. With Brexit, I did vote to remain, but I do believe that if we get the Tories out, it will be a smoother process," Sophie told Sputnik.

    Rise of Liberalism

    Pelumi, who works for Restore Citizenship, a Christian organization, said that none of the key issues presented in the party manifestos really spoke to him and that Brexit may be important, but it's certainly not exciting.

    His key concern however, was the rise of liberalism.

    "Whichever party you vote for there will be liberalism, it doesn't have to be a bad thing, but currently it is pushing strongly against those who are Christian. There's lots of push to tag Christians as bigots because they don't transcribe to transgenderism, homosexuality or gay marriage."

    "You will find liberalism across all parties, from Corbyn [Labour] and May [Conservative], and even Tim Farron [Liberal Democrats] was forced to say homosexuality was not a sin and I thought he was a Christian. I will be voting none of the above. I'm not passive and I believe people should be involved in voting and they should strike through their vote," Pelumi told Sputnik.

    Security

    Joshua, from London, shared Pelumi's Christian faith, however he won't be spoiling his ballot, and his main concern was security.

    "I take homeland security, from walking the streets to how secure myself and my future family will be very seriously," Joshua said.

    Police counterterrorism officers pose during a media opportunity in London, Wednesday, August 3, 2016.
    © AP Photo / Kirsty Wigglesworth
    Police counterterrorism officers pose during a media opportunity in London, Wednesday, August 3, 2016.

    "My morals and beliefs are also important. Someone who is able to negotiate good deals for us in Brexit is crucial. I voted to leave the EU, and it's important to see someone who will be able to represent us effectively down there."

    Apathy

    However, not everyone was as passionate as Joshua.

    Aden, a young voter, didn't really know much about the political parties at all.

    "Too be honest, I don't know enough about the election to make a decision. There is too much propaganda to make a choice. I feel like all candidates will be anti-terrorism and I don't care about Brexit," Aden told Sputnik.

    Living Standards

    Jonathan Lee, a graphic designer from London, wanted people's living standards to improve.

    "People's living standards need to get better, I'm not bothered with security and Brexit as it hasn't impacted me yet. I'm voting for my own well-being," Jonathan told Sputnik.

    Immigration, Brexit

    Ade, a young voter from London, believed that the issues surrounding immigration and Brexit were key.

    "The most important thing is Europe and immigration."

    Travellers at Heathrow queue to have their passports checked at the UK border
    © Photo : Rex Features
    Travellers at Heathrow queue to have their passports checked at the UK border

    "I want the nation to have its own autonomy and government so we can focus on our won issues rather than be entangled with European politics," Ade told Sputnik.

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    UK General Election 2017 (130)

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    standard of living, voters, Brexit, issues, liberalism, education, faith, counterterrorism, healthcare, security, immigration, UK General Election 2017, Green Party, Labour Party, UKIP, Conservative Party, Liberal Democrats, Europe, Britain, United Kingdom, London
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