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    A union flag is left in tribute to Labour Member of Parliament Jo Cox in Birstal near Leeds, Britain June 17, 2016.

    UK MPs Killed in the Line of Political Duty

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    "No, my pain is too much." Those were the words uttered by Labour MP Jo Cox to her assistant as she lay dying from her injuries after being shot and stabbed to death by a man in West Yorkshire.

    The father of Jo Cox's assistant Fazil Aswat, told ITV news, that Jo Cox said the words to his daughter, as she tried to help the MP who was dying on the ground.

    Cambridge graduate and former head of Oxfam's international humanitarian campaigns, Jo Cox won the Labour party seat in the 2015 in her home constituency of Batley and Spen.

    Sadly, 15 months later she was killed. Jo Cox's death is the first murder of a UK MP in 16 years.

    In 1990, Ian Gow, British Conservative MP for Eastborne, was killed by the IRA after a bomb planted under his car exploded.

    In 1984, Sir Anthony Berry, Conservative MP for Enfield Southgate, was killed by the IRA after a bomb detonated at the Grand Hotel in Brighton.

    Then in 1983, Edgar Graham, Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) politician was shot in the head by two IRA gunmen.

    Between 1981 and 1971, seven MPs have been murdered.

    Three MPs were killed by the Irish Republican Army. Another MP was murdered by an affiliate to the Black Beret Cadre — a small militant Bermudian Black Power group.

    And another MP was killed by the Irish National Liberation Party — two more were assassinated by members of the Ulster Defense Association (UDA).

    In The Line of Political Duty

    There have been two attempted murders on MPs since 1990.

    In 2000, Liberal Democrat MP Nigel Jones was stabbed and his assistant killed by a man wielding a Samurai sword while the Cheltenham MP held his weekly surgery.

    In 2010, Labour MP Stephen Timms was stabbed in the stomach by a student during a constituency surgery in Newham, London.

    Following the killing of Jo Cox as she went about her political duties, politicians have been advised to contact police about their security following the murder of their colleague.

    But many MPs showed their defiance by attending their constituency advice surgeries, traditionally held on a Friday.

    Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn shared a platform with Conservative leader David Cameron to pay tribute to Cox and announced that parliament would be recalled on Monday 20 June, "on behalf of everybody who values democracy, free speech and the right of political expression."

    "She was taken from us in an act of hatred, in a vile act that has killed her. It is an attack on democracy….it is the well of hatred that killed her," Corbyn said.

    As an MP, Cox tirelessly campaigned for Britain to do more for the plight of Syrian refugees and chaired the All Party Parliamentary Friends of Syria group. Her ten years working for Oxfam had taken her to many conflict zones.

    But it was in her home constituency, the wife and mother of two children was murdered while she carried out her duties for the community she represented in Westminster.

    Related:

    Vigils Held for Murdered British Labour MP Jo Cox
    UK Labour MP's Murder Could Heat Up the Already-Incendiary Brexit Issue
    UK Labour MP Cox Confirmed Dead After Being Stabbed and Shot
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    MP, MPs, murder, killed, jobs, surgery, politics, Jo Cox, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom, Ireland, London
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