17:17 GMT22 February 2020
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    The 24/7 curfew has been introduced in seven southeastern Turkish regions, the country's Interior Minister Efkan Ala said on Sunday.

    ANKARA (Sputnik) — Turkey's southeast is dominated by the Kurdish population. In addition, the Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK), which is outlawed in Ankara, has a strong presence there. Turkish authorities claim that recent deadly attacks, including the latest in Istanbul, might have links to the PKK.

    "Curfew has been introduced in the city of Sirnak, and seven districts in the southeast," Ala said while speaking at his ministry.

    He said that about 200,000 policemen have been deployed to ensure the protection of public order during the popular Kurdish celebration Newroz, celebrated on March 20-21.

    On Saturday, an explosion occurred at the central Istikal street in Istanbul, killing at least five people, including a suicide bomber, and injuring 36 others. The attack was carried out to a Daesh-linked suicide bomber, while five people were arrested over links to the attack.

    Earlier this month, a car bomb exploded at a bus stop in central Ankara, leaving at least 37 dead and over 120 injured. According to the Turkish authorities, PKK-linked Seher Cagla Demir was one of those behind the terrorist act.

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    curfew, Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK), Efkan Ala, Turkey
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