16:39 GMT +323 May 2019
Listen Live
    The entrance to Germany's intelligence agency Bundesnachrichtendienst BND in Pullach, southern Germany

    Prioritizing Islamic Radicals Surveillance Tough Task – German Intelligence

    © AFP 2019 / STEPHAN JANSEN
    Europe
    Get short URL
    223

    The task of setting priorities in surveillance over the hundreds of Islamic radicals living in Germany is very difficult, a representative of the country’s domestic intelligence service told Sputnik on Friday.

    MOSCOW (Sputnik), Alexander Mosesov On Friday, Hans Georg Maassen, the head of the agency — the Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution — said there are about 1,100 radical Islam supporters, potentially ready to conduct attacks in Germany. At least 430 of them are so dangerous that "a serious crime can be expected from them in any moment."

    "You have to make priorities, check them and look at what they are doing. It is difficult. We’re doing it together with the police," the representative of the service said, adding the task of prioritizing surveillance subjects is "one of the hardest."

    German intelligence and police are unable to track simultaneously the hundreds of Islamic radicals residing in the country, a representative of Germany’s domestic intelligence service told Sputnik on Friday.

    On Friday, Hans Georg Maassen, the head of the intelligence agency — the Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution — said there are about 1,100 radical Islam supporters, potentially ready to conduct attacks in Germany with at least 430 of them so dangerous that "a serious crime can be expected from them in any moment."

    "The problem is that if you want to put them [Islamic radicals] under surveillance, it takes a lot of people, many of them to track just one. You cannot survey all of them at the same time 24 hours and 7 days a week," the representative of the Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution said.

    Earlier in December, the German parliament approved a military campaign against Daesh in Syria. The German campaign against Daesh is planned to continue until December 31, 2016, and is expected to cost Germany approximately $143 million and include up to 1,200 servicemen.

    Russia, which has outlawed Daesh and designated it a terrorist organization, has also been conducting airstrikes against the group's positions in Syria since September 30, following a request from President Bashar Assad.

    Related:

    Germany Hunts for Suspects in Planned Berlin Terror Attack
    Don't Fall in the Same Trap Twice: Germany to Consider Banning Nazi Party
    Suspected Pro-Daesh Refugee in Germany Injures 2 Police Officers
    Tags:
    islamic extremism, radicals, Germany, Syria
    Community standardsDiscussion
    Comment via FacebookComment via Sputnik