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    UK Unveils Drone Use Rules After Near-Collisions With Passenger Jets

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    The handbook for drone users was introduced a year after a drone passed 20 feet above an Airbus airliner's wing as the plane was landing at Heathrow Airport. The new rules advise that unmanned aerial vehicles should not be flown near airports nor above 400 feet.

    MOSCOW (Sputnik) — The United Kingdom’s Civil Aviation Authority (CCA) unveiled a list of rules for using drones on Wednesday after a series of near collisions involving passenger planes.

    "Drone operators need to put safety at the forefront of their minds when flying, though, and ensure there is no conflict with commercial manned traffic," the CAA said in a statement.

    The handbook for drone users, dubbed the "dronecode," advises that unmanned aerial vehicles should not be flown near airports nor above 400 feet. The CAA said that drones had been spotted flying at heights of 2,000 feet in areas where large aircraft are known to be present.

    "Drone users must understand that when taking to the skies they are entering one of the busiest areas of airspace in the world — a complex system that brings together all manner of aircraft including passenger aeroplanes, military jets, helicopters, gliders, light aircraft and now drones," CAA Policy Director Tim Johnson noted.

    The tighter air security rules are being introduced a year after a drone passed 20 feet above an Airbus airliner's wing as the plane was landing at Heathrow Airport.

    Most recently, an Embraer passenger jet nearly collided with an unidentified drone at a Warsaw airport on Tuesday, prompting a search that involved Polish police and the military.

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    safety, drone, aircraft, aviation, United Kingdom
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