07:47 GMT +323 September 2019
Listen Live
    Estonian soldiers take part in an annual military exercise together with several units from other NATO member states on May 18, 2014 near Voru close to the Estonian-Russian border in South Estonia

    Paranoid Corner: Omnipresent Little Green Men Seen All Around Europe

    © AFP 2019 / RAIGO PAJULA
    Europe
    Get short URL
    1396
    Subscribe

    Europe seems to be thoroughly paranoid about an imminent invasion of scary “little green men”, largely associated with Russian officers, who are standing on the doorstep, just waiting for the right moment to rush in. While some may think of this as an amusing diversion, sadly enough propaganda like this is becoming embedded into people’s minds.

    Poland seems to be at the forefront of the hysteria. The country is in the grip of a pandemic resulting in a string of half-baked initiatives aimed at securing the safety of the state. According to some media sources, “its doctors, shopkeepers, lawmakers and others are heeding a call to receive military training in case of an invasion.”

    Warsaw is set to place six observation towers, mostly financed by the European Union, on its border with Russia, “to monitor and control sectors of the state border.”

    Its neighbor, Lithuania, is also in on the act. It is restoring the draft to the army and is supposedly teaching citizens what to do in case a war breaks out. 
    Polish Chief of Defense, General Mieczysław Gocuł, did not miss the chance to assure Vilnius that Warsaw is ready to meet such a threat, but it is counting strongly on NATO to provide advance warning.

    In March this year Lithuania was so panicked about an impending Russian invasion that it shut down and cordoned off two of its train stations, having confused a train of Russian students with the notorious little green men.

    Another Baltic republic, Estonia, has also distinguished itself by confusing its own servicemen, who were on military exercises in the city of Tapa, with the little green men. Even though Tapa has been home to soldiers since the 1930s, and plays an important role in training the young men and women of the Estonian Defense Forces.

    Estonian soldiers take part in an annual military exercise together with several units from other NATO member states on May 18, 2014 near Voru close to the Estonian-Russian border in South Estonia
    © AFP 2019 / RAIGO PAJULA
    Estonian soldiers take part in an annual military exercise together with several units from other NATO member states on May 18, 2014 near Voru close to the Estonian-Russian border in South Estonia

    Latvia is has also caught the bug, and has said it said now has plans to give university students military training next year.

    Another nearby country, Sweden, believes that every third Russian diplomat who visits the country is a spy.

    Last year, the country was involved in a wild goose chase for what it thought was a Russian submarine supposedly patrolling in its waters. The submarine was never found, but the country spent almost $3 million of taxpayers' money on the attempt to find it.

    Lithuania however seems to have been the first to wake up and come to its senses. Having analyzed what could be behind the paranoia, the analysts came up with the answer that it is actually a result of heavy anti-Russian propaganda in the local media. The experts also suggested that if the people are really that interested in Russia, then why not to divert their attention to the actual treasures that Moscow boasts – its history and culture.

    Related:

    Sweden Pumps Billions Into Submarine Hunt for Fear of Going Under
    Sweden’s Navy Believes Mini-Submarine Seen in Stockholm Archipelago Waters
    Sweden Calls off Hunt for Foreign Submarine in Territorial Waters: Navy
    Tags:
    little green men, paranoia, propaganda, military, Lithuania, Estonia, Sweden, Europe, Poland, Latvia
    Community standardsDiscussion
    Comment via FacebookComment via Sputnik