12:33 GMT +324 July 2019
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    An annular solar eclipse in seen from Machida, on the outskirts of Tokyo

    Rare Solar Eclipse

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    A rare solar eclipse began on Friday enabling skywatchers in Europe, North Africa, and northern regions of Asia to experience a total or partial midday darkness.

    MOSCOW (Sputnik) The rare event is live-streamed by the Slooh Community Observatory from the Faroe Islands, where the eclipse made its first landfall at around 08:38 GMT. The Faroes and the Norwegian island of Svalbard are the only sites that will see a total eclipse during the event. Complete darkness will encompass the Faroe Islands at 09:41 GMT.

    In the United Kingdom, the eclipse will be at its deepest around 09:35 GMT. The country won’t see another eclipse up until 2090.

    Germany lost 70% of its solar power as the result of the eclipse.

    In Moscow, the eclipse will begin at 09:13 GMT, and reach its fullest at 10:20. Friday’s partial solar eclipse is the largest for the northwestern areas of the country since 1999. The next solar eclipse will be seen in Moscow in 2026. 

    Total solar eclipses occur when the Moon passes between the Sun and Earth, blocking sunlight from reaching the surface of the Earth.

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      Rare Solar Eclipse
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    © Sputnik / Alexei Danichev
    Rare Solar Eclipse

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