15:05 GMT +314 November 2019
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        Homeguards came out on streets of Muzaffarnagar in UP with a begging bowl to protests govt's decision to remove 25,000 homeguards due to financial constraint

    India’s Auxiliary Police Take to Streets With Begging Bowls to Protest Gov't Layoffs - Video

    © Photo: Piyush Rai/twitter
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    New Delhi (Sputnik): Auxiliary guards or Home Guards in northern India’s Uttar Pradesh took to the streets, to protest against the state government’s decision to terminate 25,000 posts due to budget constraints, ahead of the Diwali festival.

    Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath's decision was met with a huge uproar, after the service of 25,000 auxiliary forces personnel was ended on 15 September.

    In a video that has gone viral on social media, the now-redundant guards were seen begging on the streets with bowls in their hands to protest against the government's decision.

    An additional 99,000 memebers of the auxiliary forces- a voluntary force that acts in support of the state police - also are at risk of losing partial employment as the government has reduced their servie from 25 to 15 working days.

    Earlier, the guards were entitled to a daily allowance equivalent to $69, which was subsequently raised to approximately $79 after a court order. The pay hike has been cited as the reason for budgetary constraints and the ensuing cut-backs.

    Opposition party leaders Priyanka Gandhi and Mayawati have condemned the move by the Bharatiya Janata Party-led government, saying that more security forces were needed in the state to address the deteriorating state of law and order. 

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    Police, India, layoffs, Protest
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