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    Tokyo Prosecutors Indict Ex-Nissan Chairman Ghosn on New Charges - Reports

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    TOKYO (Sputnik) - The Tokyo Public Prosecutors Office brought new charges against former Nissan Chairman Carlos Ghosn on two counts on Friday, the Kyodo news agency reported.

    Ghosn, previously charged with underreporting his salary, has been indicted for aggravated breach of trust and violations of financial law, according to the outlet.

    Prosecutors allege that Ghosn unlawfully transferred funds from a Nissan subsidiary to a company run by a Saudi businessman after the latter helped Ghosn to cover personal investment losses.

    Moreover, Ghosn reportedly failed to disclose $40 million of the salary he received over a 3-year period.

    Former Nissan Representative Director Greg Kelly, Ghosn's right-hand man, has been indicted on the same charges, the media outlet added.

    Both Nissan officials were arrested on November 19 on allegations of misreporting Ghosn’s earnings between 2010 and 2015. Both men have denied the claims.

    READ MORE: Nissan Ex-Chair Planned to Get $71Mln From Company After Retirement — Reports

    On December 23, the court ruled to extend Ghosn's arrest until January 1 in light of new charges brought by the prosecutor's office, which now suspected him of shifting a personal investment loss worth more than $16 million to the Japanese automaker. On December 31, a court in Tokyo decided to extend Ghosn's detention by another 10 days as part of an arrest warrant linked to the breach of trust. Meanwhile, Kelly was released on bail on December 25.

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    charges, court, Nissan, Japan
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