01:35 GMT +317 July 2018
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    Rescuers run out of a hotel during an aftershock after an earthquake hit Hualien, Taiwan February 7, 2018

    Shocking PHOTOS, VIDEOS Show Aftermath of Deadly Taiwan Quake

    © REUTERS / Tyrone Siu
    Asia & Pacific
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    The number of people killed in the recent earthquake in eastern Taiwan has increased up to six people, while the number of those injured grew up to 256 and 88 more people went missing, the figures of Taiwan's National Fire Agency said Wednesday.

    Aftershocks show no signs of abating in the city of Hualien in eastern Taiwan, which was hit by the 6.4-magnitude earthquake on February 6, the second such disaster in the area in several days. Soon after that a set of aftershocks was registered.

    A search and rescue operation is under way in the city, where at least five buildings were partially or completely destroyed, including the Marshal Hotel.

    More than 560 residential buildings were left without electricity due to the earthquake.

    According to the fire department, over 1,300 people, including police officers, firefighters and medics, were engaged in the rescue operation after the quake.

    A fireman works at a collapses building after earthquake hit Hualien, Taiwan February 7, 2018
    © REUTERS / Tyrone Siu
    A fireman works at a collapses building after earthquake hit Hualien, Taiwan February 7, 2018

    Earlier, the United States Geological Survey reported that a 6.4 magnitude earthquake had hit the area 22 km (14 miles) east-northeast of the city of Hualien city in eastern Taiwan.

    The quake occured at a depth of 1km (0.6 miles), according to the report.

    Twitter users have meanwhile shared their photos of the aftermath of the "huge and catastrophic" earthquake in Hualien, including the tilting Marshal Hotel.

    Related:

    Number of Injured in Taiwan Quake Rises to 188
    Powerful Earthquake Hits Taiwan - USGS
    Tags:
    search-and-rescue operation, earthquake, aftershocks, disaster, Twitter, Taiwan
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