08:23 GMT +325 May 2018
Listen Live
    In this Oct. 12, 2017, photo, ever-growing amount of contaminated, treated but still slightly radioactive, water at the wrecked Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant is stored in about 900 huge tanks, including those seen in this photo taken during a plant tour at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture, northeast of Tokyo

    New PHOTOS of Japanese Nuclear Reactor's Wreckage Released

    © AP Photo / Pablo M. Diez/Pool
    Asia & Pacific
    Get short URL
    0 42

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant was hit by a huge tsunami triggered back in 2011, leading to the worst nuclear disaster since the one in Chernobyl in 1986.

    Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO), the operator of destroyed Fukushima nuclear power plant, late Friday published fresh images from inside a damaged reactor, the AFP news agency reported Saturday.

    Images captured by a special camera installed on a robotic probe, showed broken metal parts, debris and rubble, including fragments that may contain melted nuclear fuel. 

    A photo taken by a robotic probe provided by the International Research Institute for Nuclear Decommissioning, Friday, Jan. 19, 2018, shows a part of what is believed to be the handle of the fuel rods container and melted fuel in small lumps scattered on a structure below the Fukushima reactor core
    © AP Photo / International Research Institute for Nuclear Decommissioning
    A photo taken by a robotic probe provided by the International Research Institute for Nuclear Decommissioning, Friday, Jan. 19, 2018, shows a part of what is believed to be the handle of the fuel rods container and melted fuel in small lumps scattered on a structure below the Fukushima reactor core

    The operation, carried out in one of the facility's three destroyed reactors, is a part of the company's efforts to dismantle the tsunami-hit plant, while locating fuel debris is a key priority of the process.

    A photo taken by a robotic probe provided by the International Research Institute for Nuclear Decommissioning, Friday, Jan. 19, 2018, shows a view of the bottom of a structure housing a safety system called the control rod drive, which appeared rusty and coated with unidentified material at the Fukushima nuclear plant
    © AP Photo / International Research Institute for Nuclear Decommissioning
    A photo taken by a robotic probe provided by the International Research Institute for Nuclear Decommissioning, Friday, Jan. 19, 2018, shows a view of the bottom of a structure housing a safety system called the control rod drive, which appeared rusty and coated with unidentified material at the Fukushima nuclear plant

    Due to high radiation levels, TEPCO has been struggling to inspect the reactors since 2011, but succeeded last year, publishing similar images of the No. 3 reactor.

    "The success in taking the latest pictures was another milestone for our decommissioning process," the company's spokesman told AFP, adding that TEPCO planned to begin removing the debris in 2021.

    READ MORE: Japanese Regulator Advocates Releasing Toxic Water Into Sea at Fukushima

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster occurred in March 2011, when the plant was hit by a 46-foot tsunami triggered by a 9.0-magnitude offshore earthquake, crippling the facility’s cooling system and resulting in the leakage of radioactive materials, hydrogen-air explosions and eventually the plant’s shutdown. The accident is regarded as the world’s worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl in 1986.

    Related:

    UK Foreign Minister Drinks Juice From Fukushima (VIDEO)
    Japan Begins Disposal of Radioactive Waste From Fukushima Disaster
    Strong 5.9-Magnitude Quake Hits Eastern Japan Off Fukushima Coast
    Tags:
    nuclear disaster, Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO), Japan
    Community standardsDiscussion
    Comment via FacebookComment via Sputnik
    • Сomment