05:27 GMT +324 October 2017
Live
    In this image released by the U.S. Navy, the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson, flanked by South Korean destroyers, from left, Yang Manchun and Sejong the Great, and the U.S.Navy's Wayne E. Meyer and USS Michael Murphy, transit the western Pacific Ocean Wednesday, May 3, 2017.

    US Aircraft Carriers Ronald Reagan, Carl Vinson Withdraw From Sea of Japan

    © AP Photo/ U.S. Navy
    Asia & Pacific
    Get short URL
    1212069349

    The US aircraft carriers Ronald Reagan and Carl Vinson deployed to the Sea of Japan amid tensions around North Korea, withdrew from the area, media reported Thursday.

    TOKYO (Sputnik) — According to the Japanese broadcaster NHL, the aircraft carriers left the sea on Monday after completing the military exercises last week.

    The Carl Vinson will return to the home port in the US city of San Diego, the same reports added. However, the situation around North Korea's nuclear and ballistic missile program will be further monitored by USS Nimitz carrier which is supposed to join Japan and India for joint military exercises in the Indian Ocean in July and head to the Persian Gulf subsequently, the outlet suggested.

    The Carl Vinson carrier and its strike group including two destroyers and a cruiser was initially to the area close to North Korea in April in response to the repeated ballistic missile tests by the country. Since then, the situation around Pyongyang escalated further with several more missile launches by North Korea including the most recent on May 29. The launches were carried out by Pyongyang in violation of the UN resolutions.

    Related:

    Moscow Won't Veto UN Security Council Resolution on North Korea
    US Anti-North Korea Sanctions Continue to Affect Ties With Russia - Kremlin
    Keep Calm For Now: Why North Korea Still ‘Years Away From Creating ICBMs’
    Tags:
    tensions, USS Ronald Reagan, USS Carl Vinson, Sea of Japan
    Community standardsDiscussion
    Comment via FacebookComment via Sputnik
    • Сomment