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    Wild boar is seen in a booby trap near a residential area in an evacuation zone near TEPCO's tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Tomioka town

    Radioactive Wild Boars Roam Fukushima, Attack Humans (PHOTOS)

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    Asia & Pacific
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    Irradiated wild boars wreaking havoc? No, they're not an enemy in Fallout 4. They're creatures roaming the exclusion zone around the Fukushima Daiichi power plant, after it suffered a meltdown in 2011. Wild boars moved into the area after it was evacuated, but now that people are returning there have been multiple clashes between man and beast.

    In the seaside town of Namie, just 2.5 miles from the nuclear plant, the boars roamed empty streets in search of food. When the humans tried to return, they were met with bloody-toothed wild pigs weighing, on average, nearly 200 pounds.

    Wild boar walks on a street at a residential area in an evacuation zone near TEPCO's tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Namie town
    Wild boar walks on a street at a residential area in an evacuation zone near TEPCO's tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Namie town

    "It is not really clear now which is the master of the town, people or wild boars," said Tamotsu Baba, mayor of Namie. "If we don't get rid of them and turn this into a human-led town, the situation will get even wilder and uninhabitable."

    Members of Tomioka Town's animal control hunters group, take a photo of wild boars after they killed the wild boars in a booby trap at a residential area in an evacuation zone near TEPCO's tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Tomioka town
    Members of Tomioka Town's animal control hunters group, take a photo of wild boars after they killed the wild boars in a booby trap at a residential area in an evacuation zone near TEPCO's tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Tomioka town

    Although the Namie evacuation order has been lifted, over half of the 21,500 residents have decided not to return. They left the town six years ago, and concerns over high radiation levels remain. Japanese authorities assert, however, that radiation levels in Namie have returned to pre-meltdown levels.

    A member of Tomioka Town's animal control hunters group, holds a pellet gun to kill wild boars which are in a booby trap at a residential area in an evacuation zone near TEPCO's tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Tomioka town
    A member of Tomioka Town's animal control hunters group, holds a pellet gun to kill wild boars which are in a booby trap at a residential area in an evacuation zone near TEPCO's tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Tomioka town

    In the neighboring town of Tomioka, teams of hunters place traps baited with rice flour and shoot the boars on sight with air rifles. "After people left, they began coming down from the mountains and now they are not going back," said local hunter Shoichiro Sakamoto to Reuters.

    Wild boars are seen in a booby trap as a member of Tomioka Town's animal control hunters group, holds a pellet gun at a residential area in an evacuation zone near TEPCO's tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Tomioka town
    Wild boars are seen in a booby trap as a member of Tomioka Town's animal control hunters group, holds a pellet gun at a residential area in an evacuation zone near TEPCO's tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Tomioka town

    "They found a place that was comfortable. There was plenty of food and no one to come after them." 

    Wild boar is seen at a residential area in an evacuation zone near TEPCO's tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Namie town
    Wild boar is seen at a residential area in an evacuation zone near TEPCO's tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Namie town

    Japanese sources estimate some 13,000 boars have taken up residence in the exclusion zone. The Fukushima prefectural government is offering a bounty for hunters to "inspire" a culling of the species.

    The creatures reproduce quickly, however. The gestation period is only four to five months, with the average litter being four to six piglets. The cute little piggies will become, in just 2 years, fully-grown aggressive omnivores that can run at 25 mph.

    Members of Tomioka Town's animal control hunters group carry a wild boar which killed by a pellet gun in a booby trap, at a residential area in an evacuation zone near TEPCO's tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Tomioka town
    Members of Tomioka Town's animal control hunters group carry a wild boar which killed by a pellet gun in a booby trap, at a residential area in an evacuation zone near TEPCO's tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Tomioka town

    There is no evidence that radiation has adversely affected the boars, although two to three generations of boars have lived in the irradiated exclusion zone. "I'm sure officials at all levels are giving some thought to this," said Namie resident Hidezo Sato to Reuters. "Something must be done."

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    evacuation, Fukushima Daiichi, wild animals, Japan, Fukushima
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