16:05 GMT12 May 2021
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    The number of victims in clashes between security forces and protesters in the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir has risen to 66 as a new wave of violence has hit the region, local media reported Thursday.

    NEW DELHI (Sputnik) — The latest clashes took place in south Kashmir’s Pulwama district on Wednesday night, resulting in one man being killed and another 18 receiving injuries, according to the NDTV broadcaster.

    Shabir Ahmed Monga, 30, a contractual lecturer, was killed when security forces raided the Khrew area in order to detain some youths suspected of participating in the recent clashes, according to the broadcaster.

    The army is said to have started an investigation into the incident.

    "The incident is regrettable. The army will investigate the matter," Lt. Gen. SK Dua said, as quoted by the Hindustan Times newspaper.

    According to earlier media reports, over 8,000 people have been injured due to the violence in the region.

    The region of Kashmir has been disputed by India and Pakistan since the dissolution of British India and the establishment of the two states in 1947. Some local residents, especially those residing in the Kashmir Valley, call for greater autonomy or even independence from India.

    In July, new sporadic clashes erupted after Indian security forces killed Burhan Wani, a commander of the separatist group Hizbul Mujahideen, outlawed in India, which has led to further deterioration of India-Pakistan relations. In late July, Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif made a statement claiming that Kashmir would one day join Pakistan, which was strongly condemned by New Delhi.

    Related:

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    'Internal Matter': India Declines Pakistan's Proposal to Hold Talks Over Kashmir
    Militants Ambush Indian Security Forces in Kashmir, Kill Three
    Tags:
    casualties, violence, India, Kashmir
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