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    A new multiple launch rocket system is test fired in this undated photo released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) in Pyongyang March 4, 2016

    The Supreme Leader Strikes Back: How Will N Korea Answer UN Sanctions?

    © REUTERS/ KCNA
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    Pyongyang's reaction to the latest UN sanctions is not surprising, but one should brace for a tougher response from the North, according to Sue Mi Terry, managing Director for Korea at Bower Group Asia, an advisory firm that helps companies do business in Asia.

    In an interview with Sputnik, Sue Mi Terry, Bower Group Asia's managing director, said that Pyongyang's reaction to the latest UN sanctions hasn't raised any eyebrows, but that one should expect a bigger and more aggressive response from the North.

    Terry's remarks came as Pyongyang fired several short-range missiles into the East Sea, hours after the UN Security Council unanimously adopted a new set of sanctions against North Korea in response to the nuclear test and satellite launch it conducted earlier this year.

    North Korean leader Kim Jong-un reacts as he watches a long range rocket launch in this undated photo released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) in Pyongyang February 7, 2016.
    © REUTERS/ KCNA
    North Korean leader Kim Jong-un reacts as he watches a long range rocket launch in this undated photo released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) in Pyongyang February 7, 2016.

    "I think that a greater provocation [from North Korea] is forthcoming, right down to another nuclear test. This is entirely predictable and expected," Terry said.

    Referring to the sanctions the UN slapped on North Korea on Thursday, she said that Pyongyang certainly "did not expect such a level of response from the international community."

    She specifically pointed to the fact that the sanctions remain the only mechanism that helps contain the North's nuclear ambitions.

    "The only stick that the global community can come up with is sanctions," she pointed out.

    The new set of restrictive measures against the North has already been called the toughest in the last 20 years. They target multiple sectors of the country's economy and make all cargo going to and from the country subject to inspection.

    It also prohibits the sale of luxury goods, conventional weapons and aviation fuel, including rocket fuel. The restrictions also ban North Korea's export of coal, iron, gold, titanium and rare natural minerals.

    Shortly after the UN Security Council issued its decision to expand sanctions, North Korean leader Kim Jong-un stated that North Korea’s nuclear warheads needed to be ready to be used at any time.

    Related:

    White House Warns North Korea to Refrain From Provocative Actions
    UN Sanctions May Cause North Korea to Consider ‘Changing Their Course’
    US Should Give Non-Aggression Pact to North Korea - Ex-CIA Officer
    Kirby: US Unable to Confirm North Korea Launched Missile Shots
    Tags:
    Democratic Republic of North Korea (DPRK), nuclear test, international community, missiles, response, sanctions
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    • avatar
      michael
      there are probably independent dealers lining up to sell for NK...
    • ariavd
      Big army there, And not a friend of us, Some who want to join.??
    • avatar
      Ny, Pogodi !
      NK is in the process of building a deterence strategy, with weapons, vectors and observation assets. This is a wise approach, and has nothing to do with the anti-force strategies of large superpowers (as for instance the "launch under attack" strategy of the US). France or UK also rely on deterence only: do not attack our lands, or you will suffer from our retaliation. From this point view, increasing pressure against NK is exactly counter-productive; the more they feel threaten, the more they feel they need their startegic force. They of course know that any kind of war on the ground would kill millions of people for nothing. So now the question is, why going on with sanctions, embargos etc? The likely answers are (1) US needs a "good" enemy, i.e. not too powerful but threatening enough to trigger defense expenditures, and (2) NK would be a good justification for increased military occupation of neighbouring countries.
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