09:42 GMT +327 March 2017
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    Adam Eidinger, chairman of the DC Cannabis Campaign, works on posters encouraging people to vote yes on DC Ballot Initiative 71 to legalize small amounts of marijuana for personal use, in Washington.

    Pot of Gold: Marijuana Sales Soar as Beer Drinkers Make the Switch

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    A consumer industry poll has found that beer drinkers in the US are increasingly switching to marijuana as their vice of choice for winding down.

    According to a survey of some 40,000 beer drinkers in America, the Cannabiz Consumer Group has noted that 27% now either make pot their go-to high instead of beer — or would, if the states in which they live legalize it.

    The $100 billion thriving annual US beer business could lose up to $2 billion in sales, if pot was legalized on the federal level, according to Time magazine, cited by the Times-Picayune newspaper.

    Some 26 million Americans bought pot legally last year, boosting projections for the annual take for cannabis-related commerce to hit approximately $50 billion in 2017.

    Despite numerous statewide legalization programs for both medical and recreational marijuana use, its approval on the federal level is not a slam dunk, as US President Donald Trump's attorney general pick, Jeff Sessions, has gone on record stating that he considers pot to be as dangerous as heroin.

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    Department of Revenue’s Marijuana Enforcement Division, DC Cannabis Campaign, Jeff Sessions, Washington DC, United States
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    • avatar
      Darrell R
      Although pot is not for me, I will admit that this is an improvement over drunks.
    • avatar
      terryjohnodgers
      Tobacco was only ever 'linked' to heart disease, lung and throat cancers, never a proven causer of such problems yet weed has been for years a demonstrated factor in mental health issues and other forms of cancer including lung cancer, but is upheld as 'beneficial'?

      The fallout from taking up this habit will be far more reaching than tobacco and alcohol combined.
    • avatar
      jas
      Sessions is as dangerous as heroin. lol
    • RedBanner
      Every single day there are a number of overdoses (deaths!) worldwide, due to alcohol abuse, legal drugs (those you can buy on a pharmacy, including with a Doctor prescription) abuse, as well as street hard drugs (cocaine, heroin, crack, amphetamines, etc) abuse. No idea how many people cross over every single day worldwide, because of overdosing while using/consuming these substances, but there are plenty of them!

      As far as I know, since Mankind exists, there was never, ever, one single overdose due to the consumption of cannabis/marijuana/pot/hashish, whatever one may call it, or whatever/how the plant is used.

      The only reason I see for "pot" to be illegal in a still substantial part of the Northern Hemisphere, while alcohol is legal, is an economic issue.
      Grapes, vines, grow (in general, it also depends on the grapes varieties) usually better in the Northern Hemisphere, hence alcohol has been legal for a very long time.
      On the other hand, the cannabis plant grows better in the open on the Southern Hemisphere, hence being used there for centuries.
      Chinese old medicine uses it as well.
    • RedBannerin reply toterryjohnodgers(Show commentHide comment)
      terryjohnodgers,

      "weed has been for years a demonstrated factor in mental health issues and other forms of cancer including lung cancer"

      I've never read or heard about this before!

      What I read, and hear, and see in videos online, is that cannabis has been used by people with cancer (don't know which ones, thought; maybe it works with/for certain types of cancer and not for others, I simply don't know), some in terminal phase, and some of those people get better, some even get rid of the cancer, and of course, most of those people I think they use it instead of pharmaceutical "pain killers", and other mainstream science treatments (I think those are proved not to work, as people suffer with pain and die of that cancer, or because it spreads, anyway) for not suffering physical pains associated with most cancers.
    • avatar
      terryjohnodgersin reply toRedBanner(Show commentHide comment)
      RedBanner, I would point out to you that governments have been very good at keeping tally of the many social and personal problems that alcohol abuse causes and that tobacco is supposed to cause, but I have yet to see any statistics at all on what illicit drug abuse is doing socially and personally to the users.

      I would tend to question why it is that cannabis is now being promoted as a 'harmless' drug when all the evidence available points to the contrary.

      It has been my experience (police) to see what long term cannabis use does to those who take it up as a crutch to get through life. I would caution anyone from taking it up long term.

      As for the cancer sufferers, cannabis oil has been proven highly effective as a pain relief in terminal cancer sufferers - but long term use for them is really a moot point isn't it.
    • RedBannerin reply toterryjohnodgers(Show commentHide comment)
      terryjohnodgers,

      Thanks for your input and feedback.

      "I would point out to you that governments have been very good at keeping tally of the many social and personal problems that alcohol abuse causes and that tobacco is supposed to cause"

      Yes, I see your point.
      I admit it's been years I don't rely on Govt sources (or most of the "official" ones for that matter; I guess I put them all at the same level of MSM, mainstream science, in fact everything that is mainstream), so it's not really their version/narrative of all this that I'd consider reliable sources.

      But, as for effects of alcohol abuse, I don't really need the Govt to tell me what's their take on the subject, all I have to do is look around me and watch carefully, in order to have real life "samples" of what the effects of alcohol abuse lead to in the long-term. Don't even mention in the short-term, as that is another aspect.
      Same for what I call hard drugs (and that is what I believe you call more generically illicit drugs; in many countries cannabis for instance is included in the illicit drugs definition, I do have a different opinion on that, hence the distinction between what I call hard drugs, and cannabis, which if included into the drugs category in the 1st place - which in my opinion should not be, for the simple reason it doesn't match one of the main characteristics of any real drug, which is provoking addiction; as far as I know, cannabis does not provoke any addiction at all - , then I'd have one category for cannabis alone, which I'd include into a small group of "soft" drugs), we can all see, worldwide, with our own eyes, the terrible effects it's causing to a whole lot of people! Almost in every city on this planet, there are places where junkies meet, supply, etc, and that is as sad in the UK, the USA, or Afghanistan!

      "I have yet to see any statistics at all on what illicit drug abuse is doing socially and personally to the users."

      I don't know, but I'm sure there must be some "official" data somewhere, about the numbers of overdoses worldwide, every single day!... Sad!...

      "As for the cancer sufferers, cannabis oil has been proven highly effective as a pain relief in terminal cancer sufferers"

      Indeed, that's what I've been reading for some time now.
      There are also a lot of videos (obviously one must separate the wheat from the chaff all the time, but that's part of it I guess) on YT about the subject.
      I remember watching credible documentaries about cases where the cancer simply disappeared in time, hence my previous mention of that.

      But of course, according to many alternative sources cancers can also disappear/be cured, in many other different ways.

      "but long term use for them is really a moot point isn't it."

      Yes, you've have a point there.
      But what about those that eliminate the cancer in the process?

      Once again, there are cases of successful cures, even using mainstream medicine ways/treatments...
    • avatar
      terryjohnodgersin reply toRedBanner(Show commentHide comment)
      RedBanner, I really have no argument with what you have written, however, I would point out to you that I don't believe cannabis is a 'soft' drug at all. My experience has been that people will become dependant on it. I once locked up a young man who had been doing break and enters and was doing that to support his drug habit of using 60 (sixty) cones a day.

      Others, I have had to schedule to psyche wards on their long term dependency of cannabis that caused them to become mentally ill, usually schizophrenia or worse.

      So, as I have suggested in my previous comment, long term use of cannabis is not recommended by me.
    • RedBannerin reply toterryjohnodgers(Show commentHide comment)
      terryjohnodgers,

      Thanks again, officer Terry John.

      "I don't believe cannabis is a 'soft' drug at all."

      As I mentioned above I'd only include it in the "drugs" category, because of the current model. IMO it's no more a "drug" than coffee, or tea, or wine (or any other liquor, for that matter), etc. In fact, IMO, it's much less malevolent than any of these other examples just mentioned.
      That is why, if not dependent on the current model, I don't even consider it a "drug" at all (for the reasons previously mentioned).

      "My experience has been that people will become dependant on it."

      Not my experience at all.
      You have (public knowledge) at least 3 former POTUS that admitted having smoked pot (Clinton, Obama, Bush junior), I could give you examples of other political leaders from other countries who also did the same at some point on their lives. We know most politicians are insane, but is that a direct result of what they smoked? Or were they born insane already? I'd bet on the last one.

      "I once locked up a young man who had been doing break and enters and was doing that to support his drug habit of using 60 (sixty) cones a day.
      Others, I have had to schedule to psyche wards on their long term dependency of cannabis that caused them to become mentally ill, usually schizophrenia or worse."

      Yes, I also know of cases of teens breaking into houses, robbing other people, etc, allegedly because of their dependence on THC.
      In time I came to the conclusion that that is just another myth, a false reason.
      Their bad behavior has absolutely nothing to do with the consumption of pot.
      There's always (an)other reason(s) for that.
      Either they were already mentally ill before smoking their 1st joint, or they also consume other real drugs, or they are just thugs, that either smoking pot, or not at all, have that type of behavior because that's how they are. But not as a consequence of pot consuming. THC does not provoke addiction, and based on my experience, it certainly does not transform nice people into thugs. It does not happen.

      "So, as I have suggested in my previous comment, long term use of cannabis is not recommended by me."

      Here I fully agree, me neither I don't recommend whatever to anyone. After all, we live in a free-will Universe, so it's up to each one of us to carry on with his/her own life without interfering into other people's free-will.
      Good or wrong choices in this life is something each one of us will have to be accountable for after we transition, and it's personal and nontransferable...

      I'm not fully aware of all the details, but I believe that as for legislation in the USA concerning this matter, you are far behind other countries legislation and are only now improving it. No one would be arrested and locked up in most European countries for... pot!
      Spain, The Netherlands, are good examples of how this matter should be dealt with, IMO.

      Obviously I fully support the recent initiative of your congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard, concerning pot decriminalization:

      www.rt.com/viral/381763-tulsi-gabbard-decriminalize-marijuana
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