07:59 GMT +315 October 2019
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    In what could be madness comparable to the fabled legend himself, a huge fan of Miguel de Cervantes Don Quixote posted his entire novel on Twitter, comprising in total of 17,000 tweets, the Spanish newspaper El Mundo reported.

    Spaniard Puts Entire Don Quixote Online Using 17,000 Tweets

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    In what could be madness comparable to the fabled ‪Don Quixote‬ himself, a huge fan of Miguel de Cervantes posted his entire novel on Twitter, dividing it into 17,000 tweets.

    Diego Buendia, a retired computer engineer from Spain, is a huge literature fan. So much so that he is marking the 400th death anniversary of author Miguel de Cervantes by publishing his best-known novel Don Quixote on Twitter. Entirely. Tweet after tweet.

    Some might think what's so special about that, right? Find a text and copy-and-paste it on your account. But not so fast, as it's so happened that Twitter messages are limited to 140 characters only.

    But Diego Buendia, a 55-year-old from Barcelona, was relentless and came up with an algorithm to divide the entire novel into a total of 17,000 fragments to fit Twitter's format, the newspaper said.

    Buendia then set up the account @QuijoteEn17000Tuits and began posting Cervantes' novel in 17,000 tweets, putting online 28 fragments of Don Quixote every day.

    ​Currently the account has almost 11,000 followers, one of them is reportedly Spain's Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy.

    Buendia will send the final tweet on Friday, on the day of Cervantes' death, thus successfully re-tweeting the entire novel, the Spanish newspaper El Mundo reported. 

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    Tags:
    novel, Don Quixote, Twitter, Diego Buendia, Miguel de Cervantes, Spain
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