09:11 GMT21 January 2021
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    British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has welcomed new Conservative MPs into the House of Commons, ahead of the Queen’s speech on Thursday and is expected to put his Brexit deal to a vote as soon as possible.

    UKIP’s David Kurten has shared his views on UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson's divorce bill.

    Sputnik: Would Boris Johnson’s Brexit deal enable the UK to get rid of the EU’s red tape?

    David Kurten: I’ve always said that the only real Brexit is a WTO rules Brexit, a clean break Brexit and that’s what I think the majority of the seventeen point four million people voted for in 2016, but we are where we are now and people believed Boris Johnson’s mantra of getting Brexit done, it’s such a good election slogan; even I was saying it towards the end, because it’s how people speak and it’s what people want.

    Every time people tried to scrutinise him on the details of his new treaty with the EU, he just reverted to talking about his mantra, get Brexit done, stick it in the oven, it’s an oven-ready deal, let’s get on with it and people bought what he was selling, so we are where we are and it’s obvious that it will be put before parliament very soon, and it looks like that’s what’s going to happen and on the 31st of January we will have Brexit, but it will be according to the terms of this new treaty that he is going to do with the EU.

    We’ll come out of the European Parliament and we’ll come out of the European Commission, we’ll come out of the Common Fisheries Policy, but there will be a new fisheries agreement according to the political declaration, which we don’t know what it’s going to be yet.

    The danger is also there for our armed forces, that we will still be tied into the EU’s command and control structure of all the other European armies, because the treaty makes provisions to still be part of the European defence funding, European defence agency and so on, so I don’t think it’s a clean break Brexit, and we’ll see what the details of any possible future partnership and trade agreement will be over 2020, and then we’ll know for sure.

    Sputnik: How will the  British public react if Boris Johnson doesn’t fulfil his election campaign promises?

    David Kurten: The one really good thing about Boris Johnson having a thumping majority, is that he roundly defeated Corbyn and his progressive allies the Liberal Democrats and the SNP; although the SNP have a majority in Scotland, which is problematic in its own way, but over the whole UK we are spared the nightmare of a Marxist government which would have destroyed the UK’s economy and culture very quickly, so whatever happens, that is one good thing.

    People have put their trust in Boris, and I think people voted for him personally rather than the Conservative Party, and maybe they also voted for Brexit rather than Boris, because they believed that he would get Brexit done.

    I think that if he doesn’t deliver a very hard kind of Brexit; people are going to be very disappointed, particularly in the ex-Labour seats in the north of England and the midlands, they put their trust in him, so if he doesn’t deliver Brexit and do the other things that he has alluded to, like cutting immigration, ending the BBC license, abolishing the department for international development and slashing the overseas aid budget and spending that money in the UK, if he doesn’t do those things and if he is being deceptive, then people will be very disappointed in him and I think there will be a reaction.

    Boris Johnson now has to deliver on everything that he has said and all the promises that he has made.

    Sputnik: Are the Tories actually a socially conservative political party?

    David Kurten: They are not socially conservative; the majority of them are socially liberal still. I think the only political party in the country that is genuinely socially conservative is UKIP, I’m in UKIP and I wrote our manifesto for this election, and I definitely made it a socially conservative manifesto, but they are saying nothing about the LGBT agenda being pushed into primary schools, which parents are very worried about, parents don’t want their kids to be taught about transgenderism at the age of four and to be so confused that they don’t know whether they are a boy or a girl, so they are completely silent on those kinds of issues.

    Now Johnson has a very large majority; he will either go one way or the other, he’ll either go back to the right or more accurately to being socially conservative, which I think is what a lot of people who did vote for him are of that mind-set, or he will go the socially liberal woke direction and so that will become apparent and obvious over the next few months.

    My feeling is that he will try to avoid talking about any social issues, but then in a few months’ time the social liberalism of the Conservative or Conservative in name only MPs will become apparent and that will be very disappointing to the country as a whole and the people that voted for him, of whom a majority are socially conservative.

    The views and opinions expressed in the article do not necessarily reflect those of Sputnik.

    Tags:
    deal, withdrawal, Brexit, UK Conservative Party, Boris Johnson, United Kingdom
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