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    A pro-leave supporter, right, hods a placard in front of a group of pro-remain supporters during demonstrations in London, Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019. Britain's Parliament is set to vote on competing Brexit plans, with Prime Minister Theresa May desperately seeking a mandate from lawmakers to help secure concessions from the European Union.

    Second Brexit Referendum 'Now Very Likely' - Journo

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    According to reports from think tank “the Resolution Foundation”, public spending in the UK could be set to soar no matter what the outcome of December’s general election.

    With both the Conservatives and Labour having pledged to significantly increase the funds available for various social programmes thus far. But will said levels of spending; actually be possible without severely increasing taxes and damaging business? Or is this merely an example of two sides vying for vital political capital?

    Journalist David Lindsay shares the views on the matter.

    Sputnik: Could pledges for further investment in public services made by both the Conservative and Labour Parties realistically be carried out?

    David Lindsay: It can be done. A sovereign state with its own free floating currency has as much of that free flowing currency as it chooses to issue to itself.

    The election will result in a hung parliament, beyond that I will predict absolutely nothing, that’s become a fools game now, but there is going to be another hung parliament, I’ve no idea who’s going to be the largest party; it would be either the Conservatives or Labour, but I’ve got no idea which one.

    Sputnik: Could a second Brexit referendum be on the cards now that Article Fifty has been postponed until January 2020?

    David Lindsay: A second referendum is now really very likely because the extension period has now gone into 2020, and if that happened, as it now has; there was always a very high chance of a second referendum taking place.

    Sputnik: What would the British public’s reaction be if a second Brexit referendum was held and the UK’s departure from the EU was ultimately cancelled?

    David Lindsay: There would be great anger among many of the leave voters, but it’s very difficult to say what anyone could really do about it, and it would leave a scar that would last for the rest of many people’s lives, it would be definitive of British political activity for as long as I was left alive.

    The views and opinions expressed in the article do not necessarily reflect those of Sputnik.

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