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    Proroguing Parliament ‘Serves British Democracy, Not Acts Against It’ - Analyst

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    With the countdown to Brexit deadline day well and truly underway and an alliance of pro-remain MPs desperate to block a no-deal Brexit, the British government has reportedly asked the Queen to suspend parliament following its summer recess.

    Chris Mendes, Leader of the Foundation Party, has commented on Boris Johnson’s decision to ask the Queen to suspend parliament to force through a no-deal Brexit and the next general election.

    Sputnik: What do you make of Boris Johnson’s decision to ask the Queen to suspend parliament to force through a no-deal Brexit?

    Chris Mendes: I think it serves democracy rather than does anything against it, let’s be absolutely clear first and foremost; the proroguing of parliament is not unusual, except for the last two years it’s happened every single year before; in advance of the Queen’s speech, and apparently the current parliamentary session has lasted for nearly two and a half years, which is the longest since the English Civil War.

    What’s undemocratic and what is damaging democracy is the fact that we have a political class in parliament that has been doing everything they can to derail and stop Brexit since the referendum. They have not honoured the results, and the politicians we have in parliament have for many years been soft on crime; despite telling us at elections that they are tough on crime, being soft on borders, despite the public wanting to control our borders, and they’ve been soft on education standards, with the low levels of literacy and numeracy that we have in the country and grade inflation rising.

    We didn’t think in our wildest dreams that they would be soft on democracy, this has shocked millions of people, and what Boris Johnson and his government have done today by ensuring that Brexit remains on track and that we leave on the 31st of October, will be welcomed by millions.

    Sputnik: Would a no-deal Brexit be as bad as many pro-remain MPs claim?

    Chris Mendes: I don’t believe it will be as bad as the elite try to lead people to believe. The fact of the matter, is that we are leaving with or without a deal, parliament has had three years to try and reach a deal, and the bottom line is that parliament voted for the EU referendum in the first place, and when we leave it was always going to be with or without a deal.

    They voted for the European Notification Act to trigger Article Fifty, and they voted for the Withdrawal Act, which is the repeal of EU supremacy over British law. On every single occasion, it meant that we were going to leave with or without a deal, whether we can agree on a deal with the EU or whether we can agree one amongst ourselves.

    The natural and obvious legal default is to leave without a deal, and the fact of the matter is yes; there is going to be a transition period after forty-five plus years of membership in the EU, but in the long term no country becomes poorer as a result of becoming more independent and self-governing, we are going to prosper in the long-term, and Brexit will be one of the best policy decisions that we, the people, have made for many years.

    Sputnik: Could Boris Johnson win the next general election?

    Chris Mendes: I think so. It will be interesting to see when that general election takes place, if parliament forced a vote of no confidence and that was successful; then we are looking perhaps at a general election before Brexit takes place, and you can imagine that campaign would be specifically on withdrawing from the EU, possibly a no-deal Brexit on the table.

    Perhaps it will be later, so we’ll see exactly when it takes place. We have got the right people in government from the leave point of view; for those of us that believe passionately in self-government, independence and our future on a more globally facing scale. These are the right people to have in government; who believe in this policy and are doing everything they can to bring it about, despite the opposition and despite the people in parliament that want to subvert the will of the people, and on that basis, they might do very well indeed, far better than the remain alliance thinks.

    The views expressed in this article are solely those of Chris Mendes and do not necessarily reflect the official position of Sputnik.

    The views and opinions expressed in the article do not necessarily reflect those of Sputnik.

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