Scientists Discover First Rogue Black Hole in Our Galaxy

© Courtesy of the Event Horizon Telescope collaboration et al.Using the Event Horizon Telescope, scientists obtained an image of the black hole at the center of galaxy M87, outlined by emission from hot gas swirling around it under the influence of strong gravity near its event horizon.
Using the Event Horizon Telescope, scientists obtained an image of the black hole at the center of galaxy M87, outlined by emission from hot gas swirling around it under the influence of strong gravity near its event horizon. - Sputnik International, 1920, 05.02.2022
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As black holes are difficult to detect, scientists used in their search the effects of lensing, when light from stars is bent by the attraction of a black hole. Given the long distances, the lensing effect is negligible, making it almost impossible to detect even with the best modern telescopes.
Nevertheless, images from the Hubble Space Telescope helped astrophysicists discover a rogue black hole, the kind of supermassive hole that wanders in space far from the center of their galaxy, according to the study, published in the Astrophysical Journal. So far, it is the first unambiguous discovery of such a space object in the Milky Way.
Researchers believe that a possible microlensing event that they observed in 2011 was caused by a free-floating black hole, wandering in interstellar space. At the time, astrophysicists noticed a star that appeared to be getting brighter for no apparent reason. Scientists began to analyze the Hubble data. For six years, they observed a change in light, hoping that it was due to the growth of the black hole.
Figure LB-1: Accretion of gas onto a stellar black hole from its blue companion star, through a truncated accretion disk (Artist impression) - Sputnik International, 1920, 26.01.2022
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However, they noticed later that the star's light had changed. Scientists suggested that this was triggered by an invisible moving object applying force that attracted light passing by - an interstellar black hole. Astronomers continued to study the star and, as a result, one option remained - a wandering black hole is influencing the star's light.
Overall, the evidence is strong enough to support the existence of a free-floating black hole. Scientists have even measured the hole, which weighs the equivalent of approximately seven Suns. They also determined that the object is moving at about 45 kilometers per hour.
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