UCLA Professor Who Said Rittenhouse Shot 'Black' Men Slammed After Admitting Got 'Tiny Detail' Wrong

© AP Photo / Sean KrajacicKyle Rittenhouse, left, listens as his attorney Mark Richards gives his closing argument during Rittenhouse's trial at the Kenosha County Courthouse in Kenosha, Wis., on Monday, Nov. 15, 2021.
Kyle Rittenhouse, left, listens as his attorney Mark Richards gives his closing argument during Rittenhouse's trial at the Kenosha County Courthouse in Kenosha, Wis., on Monday, Nov. 15, 2021. - Sputnik International, 1920, 06.01.2022
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On November 19, Rittenhouse was found not guilty on all counts by a jury in Kenosha, Wisconsin, after fatally shooting two individuals and injuring another during the 2020 summer protests, capping an extensive trial regarding the tragic riots in that city.
Kara Cooney, a professor and novelist at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), received some heavy criticism on Wednesday over a chapter in her new book "The Good Kings" that erroneously alleges Kyle Rittenhouse shot two Black males.
"Consider 17-year-old Kyle Rittenhouse, who used his semi-automatic weapon to kill two Black men in Kenosha, Wisconsin, while waging a glorious race war on behalf of his inherited White power," Cooney wrote in the book, per Fox News.
But Rittenhouse in fact wounded Gaige Grosskreutz, 27, and killed Joseph Rosenbaum, 36, and Anthony Huber, 26, in the riots following the police shooting of a 29-year-old Black man, Jacob Blake, and his lawyer maintained that the then-17-year-old was acting in self-defense after being attacked from behind. Rittenhouse did not shoot any Black men at all.
And having met a lot of backlash and reasonable questions about the quality of fact-checking that went into her book before publication, Cooney decided to apologize for the mistake, while in subsequent posts she, nevertheless, pointed out that delving into such "tiny details" is an attempt to turn away attention from the "massive" problems raised in the book, be it white supremacy or misogyny.

"If one mistake in a little-known book about ancient Egypt elicits this much howling, it is to avoid discussing our larger problem, to avoid seeing our deep-seeded obsession with patriarchal power," Cooney added. "So yeah, tiny detail of the book with a big mistake about a massive American issue. And that’s on me. But the white supremacy is still a problem. And the misogyny is still a problem."

Such an apology, especially from a professor of history and the author of the book, evoked a strong negative public reaction under the posts.
One user recalled another high-profile case, a contrived racially motivated assault on actor Jussie Smollett that ended last month with Smollett's conviction for carrying out a hoax.
Some have suggested that since the book is already in print, Rittenhouse has every opportunity to sue the author for libel.
But mostly, people were amazed at how the professor could have missed such an obvious error, and asked as to what kind of fact-checking the editors of the book did before publication.
Meanwhile, the journalists who got the copy of the book also pointed to another factual error made by the writer and professor. While explaining the case of civil rights icon Rosa Parks, who notably rose to national prominence for her protest on a public bus, Cooney committed yet another historical blunder.
Cooney wrote, "when [Rosa Parks] took a seat in the White section of a public bus and started the Montgomery bus boycott." However, Parks did not in fact board the bus in the white section. According to the generally accepted canon, after the white area at the front had filled up, she famously refused to give up her place to a white passenger.
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