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Ancient Romans Invited Good Luck by Wearing Flying Penis Amulets, Anyone Surprised?

© AP Photo / Andrew MedichiniA view of the Colosseum after the first stage of the restoration work was completed in Rome, Friday, July 1st, 2016. The Colosseum has emerged more imposing than ever after its most extensive restoration, a multi-million-euro cleaning to remove a dreary, undignified patina of soot and grime from the ancient arena, assailed by pollution in traffic-clogged Rome. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)
A view of the Colosseum after the first stage of the restoration work was completed in Rome, Friday, July 1st, 2016. The Colosseum has emerged more imposing than ever after its most extensive restoration, a multi-million-euro cleaning to remove a dreary, undignified patina of soot and grime from the ancient arena, assailed by pollution in traffic-clogged Rome. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini) - Sputnik International
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The on-chain penis-shaped accessory stood for positive energy and was a common item in an Ancient Roman household or on the chest of a pampered child. For double protection against evil, there was an alternative – an arguably more realistic-looking two-piece “fig” item.

The ancient Romans appear to have typically used amulets shaped like flying phalluses to ward off illnesses and bad luck, the Lad Bible reported, explaining that the unique pieces were worn around people’s necks or were hung up in homes in representation of the almighty “sexy energy”.

According to expert Anthony Philip Corbeill, who shared his comments with Atlas Obscura, archaeologists have stumbled upon such amulets in various corners of the world, including in Italy and Israel.

Corbeill suggested that those who adorned themselves with the saucily shaped items would be endowed with “divine power” as its sexual energy was directly “tied to its power in reproduction”.

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Children (girls included) are believed to have frequently worn the amulets, as parents would typically turn to the supernatural to make sure their little ones were all safe and sound, even more so in light of staggering child mortality rates in antiquity (around 50 percent of kids died before the age of five during epidemics).

Some loving parents apparently sought to be even more protective, as they opted for so-called fascinus amulets – with a penis at one end and a clenched fist at the other.

The fist was reportedly dubbed the “fig” and represented penis and overall genitals, so that the possession of such an accessory was believed to bring double luck… and double protection.

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