Putin Speaks German to Ask Austrian Journalist Not to Interrupt Him (VIDEO)

© Sputnik / Mikhael Klimentyev / Go to the photo bankRussian President Vladimir Putin during an interview with Armin Wolf of the Austrian ORF TV and radio company, at the Kremlin
Russian President Vladimir Putin during an interview with Armin Wolf of the Austrian ORF TV and radio company, at the Kremlin - Sputnik International
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During a televised interview, Austrian journalist Armin Wolf repeatedly interrupted Russian President Vladimir Putin while discussing the MH17 crash in eastern Ukraine.

As President Putin was trying to lay out his opinion on the MH17 tragedy in Ukraine that the Dutch-led Joint Investigation Team (JIT) blamed on Russia, Wolf couldn’t help but constantly interrupt him in a bid to clarify his stance on the matter. At one point, the Russian president asked the interviewer to be patient and let him finish before asking any further questions, quickly switching to German to convey his message.

“Let me finish, for God’s sake. Seien Sie so nett, lassen Sie mich etwas sagen. [Please be so kind as to let me say something]” the president chuckled.

TWEET: “’Let me finish, for God’s sake’: during an hour and a half long interview, Austrian journalist Armin Wolf has interrupted Putin 11 times, breaking Megyn Kelly’s record.”

A damaged missile is displayed during a news conference by members of the Joint Investigation Team, comprising the authorities from Australia, Belgium, Malaysia, the Netherlands and Ukraine who present interim results in the ongoing investigation of the 2014 MH17 crash that killed 298 people over eastern Ukraine, in Bunnik, Netherlands, May 24, 2018 - Sputnik International
Putin on MH17 Crash: No One Takes Russia's Arguments Into Account
President Putin went on to explain that both parties to the Ukrainian conflict use Russian and Soviet-made weapons, and Russian experts have not been allowed to participate in the investigation of the incident.

In May, the Dutch-led Joint Investigation Team said it had concluded that the Buk missile system allegedly used to down the Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 in 2014 had belonged to the Russian Armed Forces.

Moscow strongly rejects the accusations, with the Russian Foreign Ministry dismissing them as one-sided and unfounded.

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