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Indians Adapt Brilliantly to Government's Poorly-Planned Demonetization Reform

© REUTERS / Himanshu SharmaA man displays 500 Indian rupee notes during a rally organised by India’s main opposition Congress party against the government's decision to withdraw 500 and 1000 Indian rupee banknotes from circulation, in Ajmer, India, November 24, 2016.
A man displays 500 Indian rupee notes during a rally organised by India’s main opposition Congress party against the government's decision to withdraw 500 and 1000 Indian rupee banknotes from circulation, in Ajmer, India, November 24, 2016. - Sputnik International
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The Indian government had not implemented the demonetization reform properly, but the people found ingenious solutions for the resulting problems, Deepender Hooda, a member of the Indian Parliament told Sputnik on Monday.

NEW DELHI (Sputnik) — Hooda acknowledged the importance of the fight against corruption and counterfeit currency and his support for the reform's goals.

"All the problems have been created as the government took this big decision without any proper planning… But to solve the problems some persons have come up with such entrepreneurial ideas and I welcome such ideas," Hooda, a member of the Congress Party, said.

D. Raja, a member of Communist Party, told Sputnik that the Indians were indeed facing many difficulties in dealing with the aftermath of the reform and urged the country's prime minister, Narendra Modi, to help people.

"Prime Minister should be open to review the decision on how the decision can be implemented so that miseries of common people can be minimized," Raja said.

A man holds placards and shouts slogans during a rally organized by India's main opposition Congress party against the government's decision to withdraw 500 and 1000 Indian rupee banknotes from circulation, in Mumbai, India November 28, 2016. - Sputnik International
India's Opposition Should Help Gov't Navigate Post-Demonetization Chaos - MP

On November 9, Indian authorities launched a currency reform aimed at fighting corruption and shadow economy, under which the banknotes with the nominal value of 500 and 1000 rupees (about $8 and $15) will be withdrawn from circulation.

The reform has led to long ATM lines and disrupted the normal cash flow of many businesses and daily activities of individuals. At least two protests are expected to take place on Monday, one in the eastern city of Calcutta and the other one in the south of the country, in Bangalore. A number of opposition parties, including the Congress Party and Aam Aadmi Party, have expressed their disagreement with the way the reform had been implemented.

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