Hidden Agenda? Why Washington Wants Turkey to Send Troops to Syrian Border

© AFP 2022 / OZAN KOSE Turkish soldiers stand guar near the Turkey-Syrian border post in Sanliurfa
Turkish soldiers stand guar near the Turkey-Syrian border post in Sanliurfa - Sputnik International
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The Obama administration is apparently urging Ankara to secure its border with Syria to prevent ISIL and other terrorist groups from smuggling people, weapons and supplies in and out of the war-torn country, but Bangkok-based geopolitical researcher and writer Tony Cartalucci is convinced that the US and Turkey have nefarious goals in mind.

Washington estimates that a 30,000 strong force will be able to seal off the border. Interestingly, the same number of troops is needed to create a safe zone in Syria, according to the Pentagon's fall assessment. This is not a coincidence, Cartalucci believes, and if so, it could point to a possible and troubling scenario.

"In all likelihood, the West would like to attempt to make an incursion into Syria under the guise of having been provoked at the border, and then 'needing' to cross over into Syria to pursue the provocateurs," the researcher assumed.

Syrian pro-government forces prepare their weapons at a train station in the area of Arkile near the airport of Kweyris, in the northern Syrian province of Aleppo, on November 20, 2015 - Sputnik International
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This could well be the plan, according to Cartalucci, since Damascus-led troops assisted by Russian forces are making gains and pushing extremists from their strongholds across Syria daily. If so, Moscow should make every effort to prevent this from happening through diplomatic means. 

"Diplomatically, offers to establish a border guard or peacekeeping force on the Syrian side to compliment NATO's within Turkish territory may be the best way to ensure NATO's ambitions remain where they are," he observed.

Meanwhile, Syria, Russia and Iran should keep an eye on what Cartalucci referred to as "the West’s designated 'wild cards,'" for instance Turkey, since incidents similar to the downing of a Russian Su-24 bomber could occur in the future.

"For Moscow in particular, the downing of its Su-24 should be fair warning that while cooperation should continue to be sought as a matter of good diplomacy, treachery must be expected as a matter of good strategic planning," the researcher warned.

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