The Hearts of Russia's Cities: Kremlins Are Not Unique to Moscow

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The words “Kremlin” and “Moscow” seem inseparable. The Moscow Kremlin is one of the main symbols of Russia and it attracts millions of tourists annually. However, all Russian cities used to have a kremlin, as this word means “a wooden fortress”. Sputnik guides you through the spectacular sight of kremlins all over Russia.

The words “Kremlin” and “Moscow” seem inseparable. The Moscow Kremlin is one of the main symbols of Russia and it attracts millions of tourists annually. However, all Russian cities used to have a kremlin, as this word means “a wooden fortress” – something indispensable in the old times. Sputnik guides you through the spectacular sight of kremlins all over Russia.

© Flickr / VladimirThe city of Kolomna was established in the 12th century. Originally, its fortifications were made of wood. Another kremlin was built from bricks in the 16th century.
The Hearts of Russia's Cities: Kremlins Are Not Unique to Moscow - Sputnik International
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The city of Kolomna was established in the 12th century. Originally, its fortifications were made of wood. Another kremlin was built from bricks in the 16th century.
© Sputnik / Konstantin Chalabov / Go to the photo bankThe Kazan kremlin has a long history of construction – it was only finished at the end of the 20th century.
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The Kazan kremlin has a long history of construction – it was only finished at the end of the 20th century.
© Flickr / sovraskinNizhny Novgorod was founded in 1221 at the junction of the Volga and Oka rivers. The town’s fortress, erected in the 16th century, has never been seized.
The Hearts of Russia's Cities: Kremlins Are Not Unique to Moscow - Sputnik International
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Nizhny Novgorod was founded in 1221 at the junction of the Volga and Oka rivers. The town’s fortress, erected in the 16th century, has never been seized.
© Sputnik / Ilya BogachevPskov ranks among the oldest Russian cities, as it was mentioned for the first time in 902. The town, situated on Russia’s western borders, performed a crucial defensive role. Its first stone fortifications emerged in the 13th century.
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Pskov ranks among the oldest Russian cities, as it was mentioned for the first time in 902. The town, situated on Russia’s western borders, performed a crucial defensive role. Its first stone fortifications emerged in the 13th century.
© Wikipedia / Astrakhan-museiAstrakhan used to be the residence of the Mongolian khans. The city’s kremlin was erected in the 16th century.
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Astrakhan used to be the residence of the Mongolian khans. The city’s kremlin was erected in the 16th century.
© Flickr / Andrey IvanovichThe history of Ryazan has been traced back to the 11th century. Some 300 years later, the town became the capital of the Duchy of Ryazan.
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The history of Ryazan has been traced back to the 11th century. Some 300 years later, the town became the capital of the Duchy of Ryazan.
© Sputnik / Alexey Kudenko / Go to the photo bankThe Rostov kremlin comprises the metropolitan’s palace and a bell tower, among other buildings.
The Hearts of Russia's Cities: Kremlins Are Not Unique to Moscow - Sputnik International
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The Rostov kremlin comprises the metropolitan’s palace and a bell tower, among other buildings.
© Sputnik / Alexey Malgavko / Go to the photo bankThe town of Tobolsk, established in 1587, is home to the only stone kremlin in Siberia.
The Hearts of Russia's Cities: Kremlins Are Not Unique to Moscow - Sputnik International
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The town of Tobolsk, established in 1587, is home to the only stone kremlin in Siberia.
© Flickr / Alexxx MalevThe kremlin of Uglich on the Volga’s right bank was under construction during various periods during the 15th-19th centuries.
The Hearts of Russia's Cities: Kremlins Are Not Unique to Moscow - Sputnik International
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The kremlin of Uglich on the Volga’s right bank was under construction during various periods during the 15th-19th centuries.
© Flickr / Yulia SanchezThe history of the city of Veliky Novgorod can be traced back to 859, and is associated with the origin of Russia’s statehood. The local kremlin’s defensive wall and nine towers have survived until the present day.
The Hearts of Russia's Cities: Kremlins Are Not Unique to Moscow - Sputnik International
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The history of the city of Veliky Novgorod can be traced back to 859, and is associated with the origin of Russia’s statehood. The local kremlin’s defensive wall and nine towers have survived until the present day.
© Flickr / VladimirVolokolamsk was established in 1135 and is therefore the oldest town in the Moscow Region. Its wooden kremlin was burnt and partially reconstructed in stone.
The Hearts of Russia's Cities: Kremlins Are Not Unique to Moscow - Sputnik International
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Volokolamsk was established in 1135 and is therefore the oldest town in the Moscow Region. Its wooden kremlin was burnt and partially reconstructed in stone.
© Wikipedia / Alexei Kouprianov Together with Pskov, the town of Gdov defended the country’s borders in the north-west.
The Hearts of Russia's Cities: Kremlins Are Not Unique to Moscow - Sputnik International
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Together with Pskov, the town of Gdov defended the country’s borders in the north-west.
© Sputnik / Yuriy Kaver / Go to the photo bankThe construction of a stone kremlin began in Vologda in the second half of the 16th century.
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The construction of a stone kremlin began in Vologda in the second half of the 16th century.
© Flickr / Roman DawydkinThe Tula kremlin has never surrendered. Its stone fortifications were built at the beginning of the 16th century at the order of Vasili III, the Grand Prince of Moscow.
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The Tula kremlin has never surrendered. Its stone fortifications were built at the beginning of the 16th century at the order of Vasili III, the Grand Prince of Moscow.
© Sputnik / Ilya BogachevSuzdal's first buildings appeared in the 10th century. The town received a wooden fortress a hundred years later.
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Suzdal's first buildings appeared in the 10th century. The town received a wooden fortress a hundred years later.
© Flickr / Grigory GusevThe kremlin of Zaraysk used to fend off the attacks of Crimean Tatars. After the Moscow Duchy expanded, the fortress lost its defensive role.
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The kremlin of Zaraysk used to fend off the attacks of Crimean Tatars. After the Moscow Duchy expanded, the fortress lost its defensive role.
© Flickr / Grigory GusevThree towers and walls are what are left from the pentagonal fortress of Porkhov, built at the end of the 14th century. It preserved its military significance until 1764.
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Three towers and walls are what are left from the pentagonal fortress of Porkhov, built at the end of the 14th century. It preserved its military significance until 1764.
© Wikipedia / Eduard EgorovThe Alexandrov kremlin is the oldest country residence of a Moscow sovereign. A stone fortress was erected in the 16th century featuring a splendid palace – no wonder why rulers liked it so much!
The Hearts of Russia's Cities: Kremlins Are Not Unique to Moscow - Sputnik International
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The Alexandrov kremlin is the oldest country residence of a Moscow sovereign. A stone fortress was erected in the 16th century featuring a splendid palace – no wonder why rulers liked it so much!
© Sputnik / Ilya BogachevThe Smolensk kremlin bore the brunt of numerous attacks, as the city was regarded as the key to Moscow. Napoleon’s army destroyed a major part of the fortress while retreating from Russia in 1812.
The Hearts of Russia's Cities: Kremlins Are Not Unique to Moscow - Sputnik International
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The Smolensk kremlin bore the brunt of numerous attacks, as the city was regarded as the key to Moscow. Napoleon’s army destroyed a major part of the fortress while retreating from Russia in 1812.
© Sputnik / Ilya BogachevThe Izborsk fortress is depicted in one of the pictures of Nicholas Roerich, a famous Russian artist, traveler and philosopher of the 20th century.
The Hearts of Russia's Cities: Kremlins Are Not Unique to Moscow - Sputnik International
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The Izborsk fortress is depicted in one of the pictures of Nicholas Roerich, a famous Russian artist, traveler and philosopher of the 20th century.
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