Japan Opposition Files No-Confidence Motion Against Abe Over Security Bills

© AFP 2022 / Jewel SamadJapan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe waits for US President to arrive for a bilateral meeting on the sideline of the G20 summit in Saint Petersburg on September 5, 2013
Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe waits for US President to arrive for a bilateral meeting on the sideline of the G20 summit in Saint Petersburg on September 5, 2013 - Sputnik International
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Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and his government face a no-confidence motion due to the controversial security amendments.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe reviews Japan Self-Defense Forces' F-15J fighter jets at Hyakuri Air Base. - Sputnik International
Shoulder Arms! Controversial Defense Bills Pass Japan Upper House Committee
TOKYO (Sputnik) — Five opposition parties in Japan filed a no-confidence motion in the upper house of parliament on Friday against Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and his government over a series of controversial security bills.

In May, Abe’s government introduced a package of bills to parliament that would allow Japan's military forces to be deployed in an offensive posture in foreign lands for the first time since World War II. The legislation was approved by the lower house of parliament, as well a special panel in the upper house. The ruling block is scheduled to vote on the bill later on Friday.

The opposition parties, with no majority in parliament, cannot ban the adoption of the law, but have long tried to prevent or postpone it. The opposition claims the new bills violate the Japanese post-war peace-oriented constitution. Polls show that a majority of Japanese are against the move.

Police officers detain a protester taking part in a rally against Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's security bill and his administration in front of the parliament in Tokyo, Japan - Sputnik International
Police Arrest Anti-Defense Bill Protesters in Japan as Lawmakers Scuffle
On Thursday, the opposition took a number of measures to delay the adoption of legislation, from blocking the boardroom to a submission to the upper house of a draft resolution claiming incompetence by the Minister of Defense Geng Nakatani and Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

Earlier this week, a poll for Japan's Asahi Shimbun newspaper revealed that almost 70 percent of respondents opposed allowing the legality of using the Japanese military abroad in potentially aggressive foreign policies.

On Thursday, thousands of people protested against the controversial bills, with at least 13 arrested over alleged interference in police duty.

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