2 October 2011, 19:20

W Siberia Yeti country?

W Siberia Yeti country?

Governor of Siberia’s Kemerovo Region Aman Tuleyev is hosting a conference at which scientists from Russia, the United States, Canada, Sweden, Estonia, Mongolia and China are evaluating evidence of the Bigfoot, or Yeti, still roaming densely wooded areas in many parts of the world including western North America, the North Caucasus and the southern belt of Western Siberia.

Governor of Siberia’s Kemerovo Region Aman Tuleyev is hosting a conference at which scientists from Russia, the United States, Canada, Sweden, Estonia, Mongolia and China are evaluating evidence of the Bigfoot, or Yeti, still roaming densely wooded areas in many parts of the world including western North America, the North Caucasus and the southern belt of Western Siberia. There will be video and audio footages of Yeti and a report from the United States about a possible genetic make-up of this mysterious hominid.

Dr Igor Burtsev heads the Moscow-based International Centre of Hominology:

"When

Homo sapiens

started populating the world, it viciously exterminated its closest relative in the hominid family,

Homo neanderthalensis.

Some of the Neanderthals, however, may have survived to this day in some mountainous wooded habitats that are more or less off limits to their archfoes. No clothing on them, no tools in hands and no fire in the household. Only round-the-clock watchfulness for a

Homo sapiens

around."


The reported Yeti sightings in Kemerovo and the neighbouring Altai Region are up three times compared with 20 years ago. There is some other Yeti evidence, including rudimentary twig huts, twisted branches and trees and also footprints of up to 35 centimeters. A hominid with such feet would stand about 2 metres and weigh around 150 kilos. Dr Burtsev estimates the current Yeti population of Kemerovo and Altai at several dozen.

The Kemerovo conference is sending out an international expedition to examine such evidence. The scientists will be scouring mountainous terrain in the southernmost part of Kemerovo Region.

The expedition is the first of its kind since 1958, when explorers from the Soviet Academy of Sciences crisscrossed the south of Western Siberia trying to catch or at least spot a Yeti.

Kemerovo officials, meantime, speak about a potential for Yeti tourism, as well as science.

  •  
    and share via