2 November 2010, 13:15

Russia’s Yaroslav Sergeyev wins Pythagoras Prize

Russia’s Yaroslav Sergeyev wins Pythagoras Prize
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Russian mathematician Yaroslav Sergeyev has been honored with the International Pythagoras Prize. The official award ceremony will be held on November 5th in the Italian city of Crotone, where the renowned “Pythagorean School” was established over two and a half thousand years ago.

Russian mathematician Yaroslav Sergeyev has been honored with the International Pythagoras Prize. The official award ceremony will be held on November 5th in the Italian city of Crotone, where the renowned “Pythagorean School” was established over two and a half thousand years ago.

This prestigious prize recognizes outstanding achievements such as proving Fermat’s Last Theorem, which Princeton University Professor Andrew Wiles is most famous for. Yaroslav Sergeyev got the award for his studies of infinitesimal quantities.

Mathematical infinity is a problem that has been evoking the interest of scientists for many centuries. One of the major roles in forming the present-day concept of infinity belongs to Georg Cantor, who showed that there are different orders of infinity and sought to distinguish between “countably infinite” and “uncountably infinite” sets. But only research by Yaroslav Sergeyev made it possible for mathematicians to operate on infinite and infinitesimal numbers.

“In my theory, I supposed that infinity-related issues are linked not to its substance, but to our language’s weakness for expressing infinite numbers,” Yaroslav Sergeyev told our correspondent.

Starting from this idea, I introduced a sort of a new mathematical language that allows writing down various infinite and infinitesimal numbers. Using these numbers, we can carry out ordinary calculations - addition, subtraction, multiplication and division - and thus evaluate infinity.

Apart from all theoretical calculations, the Russian mathematician developed and patented the design of a computer, capable of conducting operations based on his new method. The memory storage device was patented in Russia, Europe and the United States, Sergeyev said.

This brand new instrument for creating new mathematical models and making exact calculations will be useful in any area that requires high calculation accuracy. This language will both simplify and enhance the mathematical analysis all of us have learned at school.

Yaroslav Sergeyev, 47, a graduate of the Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod and Professor at the University of Calabria, Italy, has won numerous Russian and international awards and written over 180 scientific research papers. His works concerning infinity studies were recognized worldwide, as testified to by the Pythagoras Prize, says his colleague, Vice-Chancellor of the Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod Vladimir Grishagin.

He introduced a new paradigm of infinity, designed to develop and generalize the classical concept, at the same time removing a number of paradoxes that resulted from the classical perception of infinity. Earlier indivisible, it has now become countable and measurable, Grishagin said.

According to his Russian colleagues, Yaroslav Sergeyev is by no means a bookworm - he is fond of sports, painting and cinema. “Scientists of his level are sometimes considered to be ahead of their time, but I believe he is a man who pushes time forward,” Vladimir Grishagin said in conclusion. 

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